THE USEFULNESS OF A CHEMICAL ENGINE.

THE USEFULNESS OF A CHEMICAL ENGINE.

On looking over the list of fires which is published every week in these columns, the reader cannot but be struck by the number which occur in country towns and villages, and cause loss sometimes amounting to many thousands of dollars. On further examination, it will be found that in the majority of instances such places are altogether unprotected against fire, and haxe to depend upon a hastily organised bucket brigade to stay the progress of the flames. These fires might have been extinguished in their inception, or, at worst, the loss would certainly have been much less if a chemical engine, such as is illustrated herewith been on hand. These machines are easily hauled to the scene of action ; the veriest tyro can operate them ; and the stream they throw being chemicalised, is efficacious in its operationEven if it were not chemicalised, such a stream is powerful enough of itself to extinguish an incipient blaze, while, if that threatens to become unmanageable, the chemicals with which the water is impregnated, do their part so effectually as to render It practically impossible for the fire to spread beyond the place of origin, if, indeed, it is not quenched before it has assumed formidable proportions The value of such apparatus has been tested over and over again, and the use of the chemical engine by firstclass fire departments, so as to avoid damage by floods of water as well as by fire and smoke, testifies at once to their efficacy and to the good results ensuing to the sufferer on whose premises they are employed These engines, it will be found, soon repay the community lor the money spent upon their purchase—in fact, their first cost is often more than shown at the first fire to which they are called.

A MODERN CHEMICAL ENGINE.

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