The Vicksburg Fire Department

The Vicksburg Fire Department

The Vicksburg, Miss., department responded to 321 alarms during 1916, according to the report of Chief J. W. Wilks. The total fire loss was $70,740, of which $48,979 was on buildings, and $21,761 on contents. The total value of the property involved was $555,950. The following data concerning the operations of the department are given: Number of large fires, 46; number of small fires, 153; false alarms, 29: number of fires out of reach, 6; number of chimneys, 31; number of grass, trash, etc., number of still alarms, 83; fires confined to building of origin, 39; fires extending to adjoining building, 4; fires extending beyond adjoining building, 6; feet of hose used, 51,675; feet of ladders used, 2,158; gallons of chemicals used, 977; hours worked, 220. Washington Company No. 3 motor apparatus made 190 runs, totaling 400 miles; used 282 gallons of gasoline and 27 gallons of oil. No. 6 aerial truck made 192 runs, totaling 375 miles; used 478 gallons of gasoline and 36 gallons of oil. A large proportion of the gasoline was used in learning the men to handle the machines, and working the motors morning and night. Chief Wilks, in the report, recommends the purchase of two Larkin relief valves, saying: “These relief valves arc of great value in saving wear and tear on hose. We now have two in service and need two more.”

THE VICKSBURG FIRE DEPARTMENT.

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THE VICKSBURG FIRE DEPARTMENT.

The following editorial from the leading paper of Vicksburg, Miss., speaks for itself as to the excellence the fire protection that city enjoys; “As a whole and in detail the 1906 report of Fire Chief Wilks evidences a most creditable record, a department and management above criticism. A total loss of $24,970, in buildings and contents is not only proof of good work, but of good fortune as well. For, under the most perfect system and service, in a place the size of Vicksburg, such a year’s showing of firelosses is small. Fortified by the data in his report, the moderate recommendations of Chief Wilks for additional equipment will doubtless be unquestioningly granted. The showing for the chemical tank work is as valuable as it is significant. When such a nercentage (64) of all fires are thus extinguished, the part that this means of prevention is designed to play in fighting fire is achieved. Add to this the saving of losses and damages from water, noted in the report, which the chemical extinguisher effects, and the argument for another such apparatus is complete. Altogether, the citizens of Vicksburg have all cause for pride in their fire-force, the chief, his officers and men. The taxpayers will all admit that they have had value in full, for the cost of their fire department.”

Chief J. H. Willie Vicksburg, Miss.