The Water Supply at Beverly

The Water Supply at Beverly

Beverly, Mass., has, according to the report of the Water Board for the year ending December 31, 1913, an estimated population of 80,080, which is also the estimated population supplied with city water. The water works, owned by the city, were built in 1869-1885. The source of supply is Wenham Lake and Longham reservoir, and the mode is pumping. The builders of the pumping machinery were the Holly Manufacturing Company, and the total pumpage for the year was 606,888,708 gallons, without allowing for slip. The cost of pumping, based on pumping station expenses, $11,223.41, was $16.83 per million gallons. The total rceipts from water rates for the year were $05,952.97, and the sum of $0,294.22 due previous to the year 1913 was received. The total expenditures were $61,524.77. Of the amount of water pumped, 232,278,507 gallons passed through meters, the percentage metered being .348. The average daily consumption was 1,827,092 gallons, or 90.9 gallons per day to each consumer. There are 81,383 miles of mains now in use, and 490 public and private hydrants; 106 service taps were added during the year, the number now in use being 4,854. The percentage of services metered is 23 per cent. The report also states that in January, 1913, a Special Commission appointed by Governor Foss to investigate the subject of certain water supplies, reported, in brief, that Salem and Beverly should, in their opinion, continue to use jointly the same sources of water supply, and recommended that all new sources secured for water supply, together with these present sources, should be under the control of a special commission, consisting of the Commissioner of Public Works from Salem, of the Chairman of the Water Board from Beverly, and of a third person who was a nonresident of either city, holding no property in either city, and having no usual place of business in either City. The report of this commission was accepted by the Legislature and Chapter 700 of the Acts of 1913 was passed creating the new Salem-Beverly Water Supply Commission. Gov. Foss then appointed as the third member of this commission and as its chairman, the Hon. Nathan Matthews, of Hamilton. Commissioner of Public Works Paatrick A. Kelley, of Salem, and Chairman Robert Robertson, of the Water Board of Beverly, became the other members of this Commission by virtue of their respective city offices. Very soon after the organization of this Salem-Beverly Water Supply Commission they secured the services of Mr. Allan Hazen, of New York, as consulting engineer to help them make a proper study as to the best method of filtration of Wenharn Lake and Longham Basin water. Also a study has been made of treating these waters after being reinforced by Ipswich River water, and a very thorough and extensive study has been made of bringing Ipswich River water to Wenharn Lake. Superintendent James W. Blackmer says in his report: “1 would recommend that the 12-inch main on Elliott street be extended through Cressy street and Bridge street to the Danvers Line to connect with the 8-inch cast iron Danvers main on Bridge street. The Danvers main being under considerably higher pressure than the Beverly main, would easily furnish enough water as a temporary supply for the whole Rial Side district, in case of accident to the Beverly mains feeding this district, and would also be very valuable as an additional supply to the city proper in case of emergency.” The members of the Water Board are Robert Roberts n. chairman; John L. Saltonstall and John J. Nugent. During the year 402 new meters were added to the system, making a total of 1,128 meters now in use throughout the city. A saving of 9,000,000 gallons of water is shown over our pumping record for 1912. This showing is much more apparent when considering our pumping record month by month for 1913 and 1912. During this last year our monthly pumpage only exceeded that of last year in the months of August and September. The increase in these two months is easily accounted for when we consider that in the years 1911 and 1912 notices were sent out restricting the use of hand hose for lawns, gardens, etc., while in 1913 no restrictions whatever were issued.

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