The Water Supply of Nashville.

The Water Supply of Nashville.

In his inaugural address the mayor of Nashville, Tenn., spoke of the water supply as being, though “not wholly bad,” yet, “under suspicion,” as was shown by the abnormally large number of typhoid fever cases that recurred at certain seasons of the year, calling for the erection of a filtration plant, or for pure water to be obtained from some mountain stream, where a pumping plant might be erected and a gravity supply furnished. If such a stream could be found, the question of the city’s water supply would be solved for all time. The geological conditions are altogether against an artesian supply.” The reservoir (the message points out) is in good condition, and, with some exceptions, the water mains are equal to any pressure that may be placed upon them. The weak points are probably some of the old 36-in. mains leading from the reservoir to the city. This prevents the full pressure of water from being utilised, thus greatly decreasing the efficiency of the plant. It is false economy to pump millions of gallons of water to a height sufficient to give an effective pressure of 130 or 140 lb. at the fireplugs and not be able to utilise more than half of it. Provision should be made for a test and overhauling of these mains in the general treatment of the waterworks problem. There should be perfect circulation in the water main system. Every dead end should be so connected with other mains as to insure this, and mains should be extended to the new territory as rapidly as the funds of the city will permit. * * * The bonds for suburban water mains should be utilised as early as possible and the new territory given the benefit of water and fire protection without delay.” All the new mains laid during 1907 have been surveyed and plats made showing the location of all fire hydrants, valves, crosses, tees, etc., all of which have been recorded on city maps. There was *4»935-0 ft. of 8-in. to 6-in. main laid on 33 streets. One thousand four hundred feet of old 4-in. main was killed that had been replaced with 6-in. pipe; deducting these 1.400 ft. makes 606,004 Ifof 8-in. and 1.400 ft. makes 606.004.0 ft., now in the city. Of the above main 2,825.0 ft. of 8-in. 3,011.0 of 6-in. were purchased by private parties ami laid by the city force. The College Heights Land company purchased and laid and then turned over to the city 5,735.0 ft. of 6-in. main, thirteen valves and eight fire hydrants. Thirty-nine new double-outlet, and six steamer hydrants were set—making 942 public and thirty-four private hydrants. Sixty-six valves altogether were set. Seven hundred and twenty-nine direct connections were made to city mains and 223 to 2-iu. main and private pipes 952 new and seventy-two renewals—12,012 in the city, many being in the territory of new land companies on the outskirts of Nashville, 4 miles cast, west and south of the public square 8 miles across the city from one extremity to the other The following is a summary of facts relating to the waterworks system Pump from river through 4 miles of 36-in. main to reservoir flows by gravity to city from reservoir. Pump station (location 4 miles from public square)—Three pumps, 10,000,000 gal each: one battery of old tubular horizontal boilers of 80-I1. p. each; one battery of two new horizontal water tubeboilers of 400-h. p. each. Daily average pumpage, 16,672,406 gal.; total year pumpage, 6,085.438,126 gal. Reservoir—Capacity. 51,000,000 gal.: elevation bottom, by city data, 387 ft.; elevation low water in river, no ft.: elevation public square. 223 ft. Distribution SystemPressure, according to elevation, 20 to 90 lbs; miles of main, H4.8: services, 12,012: meters, 6.434: gate-valves. 1.280: modern fire hydrants, 076. The total number of gallons of water sold the past year was 1.381.81)9.600, including 505,814,800 passed through meters. The total revenue received from metered water was $182,669,74; total water revenue for the year. $229.864.74. The value of unmetered water furnished free—63.830.000 gal.—was $55,442.79. The annual operating and extension expenses amounted to $186,038.57; interest on bond, $64,615: balance in favor of the waterworks department. $34,653.26. George Reyer is superintendent of the department.

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