THE WATERLESS RICHMOND BOROUGH.

THE WATERLESS RICHMOND BOROUGH.

Staten Island cannot get water from New Jersey (writes a correspondent). That is the purport of the decision given recently by Vice-Chancelor Bergen at Trenton, N. J., in the State’s suit against the Hudson County Water company. The law of last winter, forbidding the diversion of the potable waters of New Jersey to other States is held to be constitutional, but, even without any such law the State is pronounced competent thus to conserve its water supplies for the protection of its own citizens and for the promotion of the public welfare. “The opinion (adds our critic) is sound both in law and in comtnonsense. inasmuch as a State certainly should have the right and power thus to conserve the prime necessities of life and industry, and. as a matter of practical policy, New Jersey will do well to take that course, for she will soon need all her available water for the crowded population of her own great cities. T he urban communities of Northeastern New Jer sev will one of these days be as much put to it as New York now is to secure a sufficient ^supply of potable water. The decision will, however, greatly disappoint Staten island. I hatborough of the metropolis has a plentifully scanty natural supply. There is not a river on the island, and there are only two or three ponds. Already the supply is too small, and the demand is rapidly growing, and. when a decent ferry system supersedes the present, the population and the consequent demand for water will he still more rapidly increased. As Richmond county is geographically so closely connected with New Jersey and so separated from New York, it was perhaps. only natural for it to look to New Jer sey for water. A supply could undoubtedly be got thence much more easily, so far as engineering is concerned, than from New York. But. since New Jersey says that shall not be, Richmond must look to some other source. Something should obviously be done with all practicable expedition. The city of New York should ascertain how far the water resources of Staten Island can he developed by artificial means. It is scarcely to be supposed that artesian wells would he as productive there as they arc on Long Island, yet it is not impossible that they would he sufficient for all needs for many years to come None can recall that they have been extensively tried.”

F. E. MERRILL, Mem. Ex. Com. Somerville, MASS.

At St. Mary’s, Ohio, two attempts have been made within a year to blow up the immense reservoir near that place. Warrants have been issued for the arrest of farmers living close by. TIact the plot succeeded the property damage won Id have been immense, and loss of life would also have probably been heavy. The reason for the attempts to blow out the bulkhead lock is said to be the fact that the farmers living in the vicinity are constantly subjected to great damage by reason of the overflow during seasons of high water.

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