THE WEIGHT OF CAST IRON PIPE.

THE WEIGHT OF CAST IRON PIPE.

WE agree with Mr. P. D. Wanner, president of the Pennsylvania Water Works association, that there ought not to be any 2,240 pounds representing one ton weight, in relation to cast iron pipe. The American ton is 2,000 pounds. Wherein, then,arises the necessity to call for any particular number of pounds,when ordering pipe? In purchasing one hundred weight of any staple commodity, we do not expect to receive 112 pounds, why,then, make an exception of cast iron pipe ? If pipe were consigned from an English house, and the bill of lading stated so many tons, it would be natural to suppose that each ton contained 2,240 pounds—and this inference would be correct. It only causes annoyance, however, to ask American manufacturers to make quotations on a gross ton, meaning 2,240 pounds, when simply calling for so many tons would be understood to mean the American ton of 2,000 pounds. We think the different water works associations ought to take this matter up and settle it to the satisfaction of their numerons associate members. If any benefit is to be derived from being identified with these organizations, here is a case where such benefit can be shown, without in anyway compromising their members. If resolutions were passed at the regular conventions agreeing to specify only tons, without mentioning how many pounds each ton should contain, users of cast iron pipe would soon abandon the unnecessary custom. We trust that Mr. Wanner, or some other member of the American Water Works association will bring the matter before the members at its next meeting, in order that the so-called gross ton of 2,240 pounds may disappear from future specifications for cast iron pipe.

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