THE YANTACAW CHEMICALIZER.

THE YANTACAW CHEMICALIZER.

THE YANTACAW CHEMICALIZER.

Dr. A. Van Riper and P. F. Guthrie, chief and assistant chief respectively, of the fire department of Nutley, N. J., are the joint inventors of a chemicalizer which consists of one or two hollow metal tanks and an extra cartridge holder, also of metal, for the chemicals (as shown in the cut), fixed on the side of the hose or other wagons, and from which the cartridges may be supplied to either tank, while the other is in use. The Yantaeaw engine can thus cheinicalizefrom twenty-five to 100 gallons when called upon. The cartridges are held inside the tank by small points, which project about one-fourth of an inch from the walls of the tank. These are so arranged as to admit of the water passing round, and through the cartridges, which are of iron, pierced on ail sides with holes of large size—the chemicals being iu crystals, some weighing one pound each, according to the size required. When the chemicals are to be used, the water enters near the top of the tank, and,after passing through the perforated sides of the cartridge and taking up the chemicalizing agent, passes through an outlet at the bottom of the tank into the hose which is connected at that point. For the regular service hose there is a two and one-half-inch iron pipe, and from this is a smaller pipe to that which leads to the tanks, operated by a valve which can at once throw into service the other tank when thetlrstisexhausted. The latter can then be recharged to take the place of the other, if so required. A small petcock at the lower end of the tank connects with a drip hose, which, when opened for a minute when the water is first turned on, avoids that irregular jerky motion which is common when astream begins to be thrown. The engine has likewise a meter, showing the amount of water used. The Yantaeaw is very light, and, when equipped with charges for the two 100-gallon tanks, which are employed in the larger size for fire department use (the twenty-five-gallon and the fiftygallon tanks form other sizes), weighs only about 175 pounds. As will be seen from the accompanying cut, the regulation hose is connected at the base of the tanks and can be used without the engine, or one can be used separately, or both together as needed. The flow taken by the chemicalizer is so small as not in the least to affect the pressure on the larger line. The Yantaeaw is always ready for action, and, when in use, no dangerous or explosive gases are generated which can prove harmful to those operating it. In fact, no gas is generated at all until the chemicalized water strikes the fire, which it speedily extinguishes It may also be added that the chemicalized water will not hurt clothing any more than ordinary water, and is so free from any injurious constituents that it can be drunk with impunity.

The Yantaeaw Chemical Engine Manufacturing company, being desirous to meet every demand, has put three different types of machine on the market. There is the house machine for buildings, factories, etc., which is attachable to the standpipe, and takes up about as much space as the ordinary hose reel. Next comes the fire department chemicalizer, as described above, and then the village machine. This last is the latest and,perhaps,the most practical of the company’s machines. It has two tanks containing the cartridges of chemical, a hose reel, and the different necessary appliances, mounted on a four-wheeled vehicle, light enough to be drawn by hand or by one horse. The regulation hose is attached from the hydrant to the machine, or, in case there is no hydrant, water is poured in by the bucketful and forced through by hydraulic pressure. So long as any of the chemical remains, the engine is serviceable. If the whole charge is not used, the cartridge can be withdrawn and dried, after which it can be replaced ready for use another time.

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