THEATRE FIRE AT CINCINNATI.

THEATRE FIRE AT CINCINNATI.

On Tuesday evening Cincinnati was visited with a $200,000 fire, which destroyed the Grand Opera house, and left only its outer walls.

A display of coolness, perhaps, never witnessed under such trying circumstances, prevented its loss from being attended by a fea_____ful catastrophe. The play set for the night was “Hamlet,” by the E. H. Sothern company. The house was packed, but the dispersal of the audience began and was carried out with the utmost order and composure. The fire appears to have started from the furnace underneath the orchestra. It soon communicated to the stage, and to this fact are owing the losses of the greater portion of the property of the Sothern company. Mr. Sothern estimates his loss at $50,000. His company was compelled to reach the street clad in thpir costumes and to lose the greater portion of their personal effects, which were left in the theatre. Notwithstanding the combustible nature of the interior the fire was a long time in burning out. As late at 10 o’clock the upper part of the Vine street front was still burning. This portion of the building was occupied by the Cincinnati gymnasium, which had a costly equipment. Adjoining the rear of the opera house, separated by an alley, is the large Butler building. The fire entered this at the-upper stories, and the two npper floors of that building were practically destroyed. The npper portion of the Gifts enginehouse, which adjoins the Butler building, was seriously damaged by the fire. The building belongs to Mrs. Charles P. Taft, whose husband is the proprietor of the “TimesStar.” It was bought by her father, the late David Sinton, from the old Catholic Institute about thirty years ago for $200,000. The additions that had been made to it since that time are probably balanced by the decrease in valuation of real estate, so that the loss may be put at $200,000. It is estimated that the les. sees have an interest in the building representing their outlay in fitting it up amounting to $30,000 or $40,000 which is covered by insurance. The chief part of the $75,000 in the Butler was by water. There was no insurance on the Grand opera house building. Michael Gavin, general manager of the stage part of the house blamed the fire on the “supers,” who, he said, were probably smoking downstairs.

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