Threatening Fire in Charleston

Threatening Fire in Charleston

A fire in Charleston, S. C., which might easily have extended into a general conflagration was that in the Tiedeman Company’s wholesale groceries building, situated in the heart of the business section. The alarm was received from a Gamewell box at 3.45 A. M. and three engines and a truck company were on the ground in from two to four minutes. Chief Louis E. Behrens saw immediately that the fire had such tremendous headway that all available help was needed to avert appalling loss of property and ordered a general alarm without delay. The building was a three and four story one, of brick and, when the department arrived “was in flames from first story to roof,” in the words of Chief Behrens’ report, “and the fire had already extended to three buildings on the opposite side of the street. The fire must have burned a long time, perhaps two hours, before it was discovered, and defects of construction permitted the rapid spread of the flames. Doorways and windows were unprotected and in the party walls where the joists were burned out of the walls, openings were made, showing that joists from opposite side of the building had not been staggered. The 80 men engaged had a Seagrave and a Webb motor engine, two Metropolitan steamers of 750 gallons capacity and two trucks. Twelve hydrants, single and double, 4and 6-inch, were available, within 900 feet of the fire, with a pressure of 40 pounds. Eleven engine streams were thrown at one time from 1 1-8 and 1 1/4-inch nozzles and 8,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were laid; of which only two lengths burst. The flames were under control in an hour and a half hut burned for seven hours longer. The loss on buildings was $40,000 and that on contents about the same figure.”

No posts to display