TO ABOLISH FLUSHING ASPHALT PAVEMENTS.

TO ABOLISH FLUSHING ASPHALT PAVEMENTS.

FLUSHING asphalt and similar pavement, entails an enormous expenditure of water, and, consequently, of money upon municipalities where such, or any similar style of paving is in vogue. To many cities, especially such as suffer from periodical droughts which seriously deplete their so_____rces of supply, this lavish use of water proves a serious embarrassment, and the result is either that the flushing system must be abandoned, or that the community must be restricted in its use of water for domestic and manufacturing purposes. In each case the public is greatly inconvenienced, and its health is endangered. St. Paul, Minn., is about to try a substitute for flushing its asphalt streets and roads, in the hope that it may thereby save money and water, and also obtain better results. The pavements will be scraped with rubber tools, after the plan followed successfully in German cities. The asphalt pavements in the business portion of the city are sprinkled eight or nine times a day. While the pavements are covered with water from the sprinkling carts, the men employed to do the hand-sweeping will scrape the surface with rubbers. The dirt and the fine dust can thus be removed to the gutters, where it can be gathered up and hauled away—thus saving part of the cost of keeping the catch-basins clean. The operation will he repeated several times daily, and the streets will be kept free from the fine dust that almost always blows about after the pavements become dry.

No posts to display