To Avoid Typhoid Filter the Water.

To Avoid Typhoid Filter the Water.

The Bulletin of the New York State Department of Health for September has the following pertinent advice on filtered water:

Some people are not dependent on a public water supply, but most of us are,

Some people are not at most times susceptible to typhoid infection, but many of us are.

Some cases of typhoid, in fact, many cases, are not caused by infected water supply, but a great many others are.

Read the lesson from the experiences of just two cities in this State, Albany and Binghamton, in adding an incredible number of years to the aggregate lives of their citizens by the installation of water filtration plants.

In Albany, during the ten years prior to the construction of the slow-sand filter in September, 1899. while unfiltered Hudson river water was supplied, 863 citizens died from typhoid fever. In the same city during the ten years since the filter plant has been in operation, 217 citizens have died from typhoid fever. The difference is 646 lives. Some of this saving of 148 lives may possibly be credited to other causes than the purified water. Some of the potential hut reprieved victims may have died from other ills, but it is morally certain that most of them are not dead yet and many of them will not be for some time.

Let us take it for granted for the sake of argument that on an average the lives of these 646 citizens have been prolonged at least ten years,— 6,46n years of life,—a count longer than the Jewish calendar.

In Binghamton during the seven years prior to the installation of the mechanical sand filtration plant in June. 1902. while the city was supplied with untiltered Susquehanna river water, 101 citizens died from typhoid fever. In the same city, during the seven years since the filter plant has been in operation, forty-three citizens have died from typhoid fever. Compute the compound interest on this saving of fifty-eight lives and note the accrued sum in terms of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” to say nothing of the economic gain to the city. The moral to the state at large is: Clean up the streams from pollution, and the moral to municipalities: If you must take water from a polluted source see that it is til tered.

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