To Improve the Asbury Park Fire Helmet.

To Improve the Asbury Park Fire Helmet.

Chief Arthur H. Hope, of Asbury Park, N. J., fire department, is the inventor of a fire helmet which he describes as below: “For many years the firemen of this city have been wearing a fire hat with the signboard fronts and gold eagle tops. These, to my way of thinking, could be dispensed with to lessen the weight and take off the height. Ask any fireman how many times he has mashed the eagle out of shape when entering a low basement, and he will generally reply, many. The suggestion given in the accompanying illus trations shows a fire hat with low crown. Inside of it is a star shaped pad open for ventilation. yet affording protection for the head should a falling; object strike cornerwise or crush the hat. The center of the pad is one and a half inches thick and tapers off to one-half inch and is made secure to inside of hat. It will be noted that there is a small “post socket” at each side of the hat, which is intended to hold the rubber band of the smoke protector in place. In going into action, in a building, or as a truckman arriving at the seat of the fire, a good fireman wants to go or remain where he can do the most good, then the smoke protector may be used, and it will allow him to remain iti a dangerous place for some time. After entering the building, however, and finding conditions too bad, he need not lose time to look up the apparatus to get the muchneeded protector, if this plan is carried out, every fireman will have the smoke protector adjusted to his hat. and as he enters the smokeidled cellar, store or building, he can adjust the protector in a second’s time antd still continue work. The rubber holding band runs from the side of the protector to the post around the back of the hat, to the post on the opposite side and back to the smoke protector. This gives ample play and will hold the protector close to the face and in a correct and safe position. The protector shown in the illustration has been used and proved satis, factory, and for this reason the suggestion is made to firemen who may care to use such protection.”

INSIDE OF HELMET USED BY ASBURY PARK DEPARTMENT.

Directing a band of 50 Italians and pumping and carrying water themselves, two girls, Grace and Helen Hamblin, both under 18 years old, saved the house of a neighbor, Syd ney Holt, from burning at Gorham, Me. The fire caught in the barn which was destroyed, but the girls organized a bucket brigade from the Italians who are employed on the Portland Waterworks and kept the roof of the dwelling drenched until there was no further danger The loss was only $1,000.

No posts to display