To Insure Richmond Better Protection

To Insure Richmond Better Protection

As Chief W. H. Joyner. of Richmond, Va. points out. the “rapid advancement in fire fighting and fire preventatives” everywhere, and not least in his own city, renders it necessary to make many recommendations in the way of improvements, while at the same time he must confine himself strictly to those most urgently needed for protection. First and foremost he rails for the substitution of paid men for call firemen, who have no place in a city so large as Richmond, one in which fires have to be fought immediately by men on the spot, not by those who may possibly be miles from the scent of action and are allow half an hour to respond to an alarm, of which they have to learn “as best they can and then get to the fire in the same manner.” A eallman, the chief claims, “is to-day considered a curiosity to other cities, even of smaller size” than Richmond. The hook-and-laddcr service Chief Joyner dulA “entirely inadequate for the demands placed upon it,” and as in these days of rapid transit delivery wagons are of the motor type, he considers it only reasonable that lie and Ins assistants should be similarly equipped. The day of the horsehauled chief’s wagon has gone by. li is the same with the fire-fighting apparatus, for which reason he asks for another motor combination engine, pumping chemical and hose wagon, and a motor combination chemical and hose wagon Suitable buildings should also he erected at convenient points for fuel and other supplies that are called for and should be on hand at once during a life. The water service continues to he improved, but Chief Joyner states there are -till “important fire hydrants connected with mains too small to give efficient results, and many hails to the hydrants from the mains are too small.” for which reason he would have all new hydrants set connected to as large a main as possible, and that all leads to such hydrant he 6-inch.” He would also have abolished the “great nuisance of allowing almost anybody the apparently unlimited use of fire hydrant, both in summer and winter.” These should he “used only as they are intended -by the fire department for fire extinguishment.” t hief Joyner renews his recommendations to have the city tug equipped with a large fire pump and pipe lines extended front the water fronts to Main street—an auxiliary that would add greatly to the efficiency of the fire department. The system of mercantile inspection is carried on by trained firemen. Rut their employment on that duty reduces the strength of the fire-fighting force and affords another argument for getting rid of the callmen and adding to the number of the paid men. During the 12 months covered by the last report of the department there were 550 alarms of fire, of which eight were second alarm, third and special calls, one apiece, general alarms, 2; still alarms, 218; silent alarms, 178, The total insurance loss on buildings was $55,070.89; on contents, $125,968.99; uninsured loss on buildings. $2,075.50; on contents. $21,879.50; total loss, insured and uninsured, buildings, $57,144.39; contents, $150,848—total. $207,992 88; total insurance on buildings. $1,868,665; on contents, $2,235,925 total, $4,104,590.

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