TO PREVENT SLIPPING.

TO PREVENT SLIPPING.

Now that winter is here when the streets will be covered with ice and snow, rendering safe and rapid service in your department necessary, we desire to call your attention to the Neverelip Horse Shoe Calk, which has by a successful sixteen years’ experience, proven itself to be almost invaluable for fire department service. Horses shod with Neverelip Calks can haul the heaviest apparatus on any kind of pavement, under any conditions of weather, with as much ease and safety as iu July or August. The cities of Detroit, Montreal and many others are using them exclusively and would not do without them. It is impossible for a horse to fall, corners can be turned quickly and safely, going up or coming down hills the horses have themselves under perfect control, and fires can be reached iu the minimum of time; whereas, with ordinary shoeing iu icy weather many horses have been ruined, livesendungervd, and valuable time lost, owing to the inability of the driver to keep his horses on their feet. After horses are shod you have extra calks at each engine house, where any of the men cau extract and put iu anew set in ten minutes. They are not expensive and if ever tried, we know your department will never do without them. Try them at least, on one engine company. These calks are made by The Neverelip Manufacturing company, New Brunswick, N. J.

At Dover, Del., on December 14, charters were filed for the American Chemical Fire Pail company, of Philadelphia, capital stock, $100,000, and the American Fibre and Fuel company, of the same city, capital stock, $100,00.

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TO PREVENT SLIPPING.

2

TO PREVENT SLIPPING.

A PATENT HORSESHOE THAT IS INDISPENSABLE IN COLD WEATHER.

No person ever owned a horse without experiencing a good deal of trouble, danger, and expense from the use of the oldfashioned horseshoe during icy weather. To keep a horse going in winter was almost an impossibility, as the only means of securing a sure footing for the animal was by drawing the calks of the shoe to a sharp point at the forge. This required the services of a horseshoer, and proved a continual source of expense—to say nothing of the loss of time and money during the animal’s enforced idleness. Some horses had to be sharpened and re-shod every day during bad weather, and even horses used for light driving were unable to go more than three or four days without being sent to the shoer.

To say that all of this has been done away with by a simple little invention is saying a great deal, but such, nevertheless, is the fact. A patent horseshoe, called the “Neverslip,” has been introduced to the people. Thus far, the shoe has been a pronounced success, and theownersof horses and fire departments are adopting it every day. The “Neverslip” is in almost every respect like the old-fashfoned fiat shoe, without any portion of it being turned up; but, in place of the calks, four steel pointed pieces are threaded into four holes and drilled and tapped into the shoe before being nailed to the hoof. The horse has a much firmer hold upon the ice, with the new shoe than with the old one, as the two extra-sharp points at the front of the shoe are much more serviceable than the old style long flat calk, which acted more like a skate than a calk when the horse turned a corner. With the new shoe the horse has n grip whichever way he may turn.

When the calks become worn, new ones may be screwed into their place by means of a wrench which is given to everyone who adopts the “Neverslip” If the horse wears one side more than the other, the calks can be shifted as often as needed to keep him going level. The owner of a horse is thus in readiness forunykind of weather, and can leave his stable with a sharpest of slaws without any extra expense. A box of calks is given to nil those who adopt the shoe, and, when these are gone, a supply sufficient to last a year may lie had for a few cents. Illustrations and further data concerning the “ Neverslip” will be found on another page of this issue.

As John K. Bittenbender’s barn burned near the Grand Opera house in Bloomsburg, Pa., while a perforrnunce wasgoiugon, many panic-stricken persons in the audience began a stampede. The coolness of the actors, however, and a number of self-possessed people among the spectators restored order at. the critical moment. Three cows perished in the flames, and six others were futally burned.