TO PURIFY WATER.

TO PURIFY WATER.

An exhibition of an apparatus for purifying water was recently given at Columbus, Ohio. The machine is partly owned by a Columbus man, and, as a result, it is probable that a large factory in which the machines are to be made, will be built in that city. It was recently patented, and its capabilities were demonstrated to scientific men before it was brought to Columbus. These men, the owners claim, praised the machine very highly. To purify the water, it is run through a cylinder in which there is a coil of aluminum charged with electricity. The water then passes into an ordinary stone filter. A gallon and a half of water was treated at night. Sediment of a frosty sort, weighing about two ounces was secured. It was placed in a cloth sack to dry. The water was partly ontof it in the morning. The sediment felt and looked like a dark colored lard. In a little bottle a half pint of city water was poured, after going through the process of purification. Sediment settled in the bottle to a depth of three-quarters of an inch. The sediment will be analysed, also the water before and after being treated. The gentlemen who own the patent are Mr. Edward Boynton, of Columbus, and H. C. Bailey, of New York. They have treated city water in a number of towns, but claim that Colum-

To Purify Water.

To Purify Water.

A COMMITTEE of the Board of Trade, of Jersey City, N. J., recently inspected the working of the Anderson process for the purification of water. The process was invented by Wm. Anderson, director general of the government ordinance factories of England. For a long time the water of Paris, Antwerp and other cities had been purified by filtration through spongy iron. In time the poresof the iron became closed up through oxidation, and just when scientists were looking around for a remedy, Mr. Anderson hit upon the plan of accomplishing the desired end by the invention of the apparatus known as the Revolving Purifier. Instead of allowing the water to flow downwards through a motionless mass of the purifying material, Mr. Anderson adopted as the principle of his invention the showering down of finely-divided particles of the purifying material through a flowing stream of water. The apparatus consists of a cylinder supported in a horizontal position by hollow trunnions which are capable of revolving in pedestal bearings. Attached to the internal periphery of the cylinder is a series of short, curvtd shelves, arranged either in horizontal or diagonal rows at equal distances. A sixth row of curved shelves is replaced by a line of small square plates, which, by means of nuts outside the cylinder, can be set at an angle with the axis of the apparatus. By regulating the inclination of these plates, the shower of iron can be directed back to the inlet end of the purifier, and the tendency of the flow of water to carry forward the purifying material counteracted. Inlet and outlet pipes enter the hollow trunnions and admit and discharge the water to be purified. As the water enters the cylinder it strikes against the circular distributing plate, and is caused to flow radially through an annular space five eighths inch or three-fourths inch in width, the formation of a central current along the axis of the purifier being prevented by this means. The inner end of the outlet pipe carries an inverted bell-mouth which catches the fine particles of the iron carried forward by the water, and causes them to fall again to the bottom of the cylinder. One end of the cylinder is encircled by an annular spur-wheel working into gearing through which a slow rotary motion is given to the apparatus. On being started to work, sufficient, metallic iron to fill one-tenth of the cylinder is introduced through the manhole.

The iron, by its contact with the water, it is claimed, not only coagulates and detains all animal and vegetable matter, but destroys all germs and bacteria. The system is now in use in Paris where 50,000,000 gallons a day of pure water .is supplied, and also at Antwerp. The company which handles the process claims to be able to supply Jersey City at the rate of $1.80 to $2 per million gallons.

In an experiment made on November 18, it is claimed that the number of bacteria in a cubic centimeter of water was reduced from 14,500 to 27. An experiment was made in the presence of the committee on some thick muddy water taken out of the gutter and the results were astonishing, in appearance at least.