Tobacco Warehouse Burned at Richmond, Va.

Tobacco Warehouse Burned at Richmond, Va.

In writing to FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING concerning the destruction of the E. K. Vietor & Co. Tobacco Warehouse at Richmond, Va., Chief W . H. Joynes says: “The building, which is located in the extreme southern part of Richmond, cover a ground space of 60 x 100 ft. It was 22 ft. high and was built about ten years ago of brick with tar-papered roof. There were brick partition walls with open arches. The building was equipped with sprinkler attachment, but there were no other means upon the premises for fighting fire. The fire, which was discovered by the engineer at 2:15 p. m., started from a tobacco dryer near the north end, and after burning one hour, it was stopped in the center. An alarm from Station 629 called out one third size La France and one Knox motor engine. There were three 4-inch double hydrants available, located about 300 feet apart and with 1,900 feet of Boston woven cotton rubber lined hose and 1¼ and iMi-inch nozzles, four engine streams were operated until the flames were subdued. The streets at this point are 60 feet wide and carry a 4-inch water main, which furnished a hydrant pressure of 30 pounds. Station 629, from which the alarm was sent, is located directly opposite the ill-fated building, and instead of pulling the alarm at once, an attempt was made to send in a telephone alarm. This caused much delay and gave the flames a good start before the arrival of the department. However, the flames were prevented from escaping from the building and the loss was kept down to less than $10,000, $6,000 of which was on the contents, which consisted of leaf tobacco.”

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