TRENTON’S ACCOMMODATING FIREMEN.

TRENTON’S ACCOMMODATING FIREMEN.

Firemen everywhere are looked upon as general utility men, to be called upon to perform odd jobs that can be done by no one else. Those of Trenton, N. J., form no exception to the general rule. Not long since, the fire department was called out to rescue an intoxicated man who had recklessly climbed a telegraph pole and made his way out to the middle of the street on an electric light cable, and who was then paralysed with fear, realizing his dangerous position. He hung in midair for several minutes, and just as the firemen spread a blanket under him, he dropped into it and escaped injury. During the week, Mrs. Kay, a fashionable woman of the city, was getting ready to give a dinner party. On leaving a third floor room, the door locked behind her, and could not be opened again from the outside. All her best gowns were in the room, which could be entered only from a window overlooking the street. The door refused to yield either to pounding or coaxing, and there was no ladder anywhere round long enough to reach the window. There was, therefore, nothing for it but to explain matters to the fire department, and send in a still alarm from fire headquarters for truck No. 1. to which Capt. Knoblaugh responded. One of the men of the house met the firemen as they were scouring the neighborhood for the blaze, and explained matters to the captain. He was ali sympathy, and in less than a half minute one of the truck’s ladders was raised in the air, and the gallant captain nimbly sprang up the rungs, and, jumping into the room, unfastened the bolt, opened the door and doffed hiscap tothe women who were gathered in a group on the landing at the head of the stairway, and who had been greatly alarmed when the fire apparatus stopped in front of the door, they knowing nothing of the appeal made to the fire department to unlock the door. Captain Knoblaugh slid down the ladder, and the fire truck rumbled off just as the guests began to arrive. Notwithstanding the confusion and the crowd of curious persons that had gathered, the dinner party took place as planned, and a toast was proposed with a will, and drunk to the gallant and obliging Trenton firemen.

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