Trouble of Water Supply of Greater New York.

Trouble of Water Supply of Greater New York.

For the third time the water supply board of New York city has rejected the lowest bids for the Wallkill tunnel, under the river of that name in Ulster county. Every time a different reason has been given. The reason for rejecting the first lowest bid last May, that of S. Pearson & Co., was that it was so low that cheap labor would have to be employed. The second lowest bid was that of Booth & Flinn, rejected on December 7. Their bid was re jected because of the alleged inexperience of the firm. The third set of bids was opened on January 7, and again Booth & Flinn were lowest. This time their bid went out, because of “curious inconsistencies’’ between it and their former bills. In announcing its decision to reject the bids, the commission stated: “The bids submitted show such an erroneous conception of the work to be done, so far as the price is concerned, that the board docs not feel warranted in making an award at the figure submitted.” S. Pearson & Son, who bid lowest at first, raised their bid next time to $3,910,153, anil then lowered it on January 7 to $3,741,778.

Justice Gerard, having heard argument in the Supreme court, reserved decision on the application of Frank J. Kane, a taxpayer of Queens, for an injunction restraining the board of estimate from authorising the purchase by the city of the property and franchises of the Citizens’ Water Supply company, of Newtown, I.. 1. Counsel for Kane stated that the board of estimate, on the recommendation of Commissioner O’Brien of the department of water supply, was about to buy the plant for $6,000,000. He said that, according to the sworn statements made by officials of the company, the value of the property was only $1,250,000. The court adjourned the proceedings for the submission of additional affidavits on both sides. Titus, who has been employed by the city to discover and develop the water resources of Long Island for the supply of Brooklyn, has threatened that borough with a water famine, so far as the supply from the deep wells at Sixth street and Fourth avenue and at Jameco, L. 1., can make good his threat, unless the city pays up. He declares that the city owes him for over 1,600,000,000 gal. of water, which is part of the amount he has pumped into the supply system in the last three months. He says he furnishes daily to the city from his deep wells 17,000,000 of the 150,(XX),(XX) gal. of water used by Brooklyn and Queens. The city reservoirs are well supplied at the present time, and no danger is feared from his threat. Jt is admitted at the comptrolcr’s office that the city owes Titus money.

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