TROUBLE OVER BIDS FOR THE MILBURN PUMPS.

TROUBLE OVER BIDS FOR THE MILBURN PUMPS.

On Friday of last week bids were opened at the office of Commissioner Monroe of the department of water supply, gas, and electricity for the building of a pumping station at Milburn, and for placing two large boilers at the same place. These bids should have been opened ten days before, but, when the time came for doing so, no bids were received, and it was found that Supervisor Cowen of the City Record had forgotten to advertise for the legal length of time in the Brooklyn official papers. Only two bids were opened—one by M. T. Davidson for $67,800, for the erection of the pumping station, and one by A. D. Granger for $11,950, for the two boilers. Previous to the opening of the bids it was announced that three had been thrown out, as no checks for security accompanied them. The bidders were the Henry R. Worthington company, the Holly Manufacturing company, and the Snow Steam Pumping Works. Representatives of all three firms protested. The next protest came from John Williams, of Wiliams & Gerstle, contractors, of New York city, who, “as a citizen,” protested against the specifications. At the same time he sent in a letter and affidavit, in which he declared .that only one firm could comply with the specifications regarding the boilers, as a portion of the apparatus required by these specifications was manufactured by only one concern, which is in Boston. He also protested on the ground that a bond of $75,000 was required for a $15,000 job, and that the chief engineer had the power to exact a fine of $800 on every unit of heat less than he might call for.

The bids received and the protests were forwarded to the corporation counsel for an opinion.

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