Trouble Over Filtration at Ottawa

Trouble Over Filtration at Ottawa

A correspondent at Ottawa, Ont., writes that in comparison with the question of the installation of a filtration plant in that city, the election of the mayor was howhere, The vote against the by-law to install a mechanical filtration plant at a cost of $1,000,000 was three to one. There is little doubt, he says, that the underlying motive for rejecting the proposition was not opposition to mechanical fitration, but to its cost. Ostensibly the objection to the installation of a mechanical nitration plant to purity the water ol tne river was to the plant being built alter the pattern ot the plant at Watertown, N. Y., which was designed by Allen Hazen, an expert engineer of New York City, who also designed the slow-sand nitration outht at Ogdensburg, N. Y.” Mr. Hazen, it is claimed, gave it as his opinion that the Uttawa river water could be most economically filtered by the mechanical system, as sand filtration was not feasible, althougn he would recommend the latter if the sand were drawn from the MacGregor lakes situated in the hills above Ottawa. This proposition, however, the citizens had turned down by vote some months ago just as quickly and decisively as they did tne mechanical on New Year’s Day. It seemed to be a case of the discontented soldier who was being Hogged for his misdeeds. At one minute the lash fell on his back too high up; at the next it was too low. At last the drum major, losing patience, cried out to his drummer boys who were wielding the cat-o’-nine tails: “Strike high, strike low, there’s no pleasin’ some folks! Hit him anywhere, boys.” So with the Ottawa folks. They object to sand filtration, because, with sad alone, chemicals must be employed to get rid of the bacilli thoroughly and though Mr. Hazen insisted that the chemicals would not remain in the water those who were opposed to the system (in reality, it is feared to the expenditure of such a large sum of money) would have none of it; in fact, they preferred the unfiltered and “undoped” water and so the sand filtration proposition went to the wall. In the same way the mechanical filtration system, in which, of course, chemicals are employed, has been turned down as not feasible, on account of the cost of installation, although it has been clearly shown that since that system, under the advice of Mr. Hazen, has been installed at Watertown, typhoid had almost disappeared in that city. For Ottawa, apparently, there must be designed a filtration plant that shall not call for the use of any chemicals nor cost too much money—the latter beinpthe prime consideration. Meanwhile those who cannot afford to drink imported bottled spring water must continue to drink the polluted stuff that does duty for water, no matter whether they are struck down with typhoid or no. The city cannot afford to spend its good money in such a luxury as filtered water.

St. Petersburg, Fla., has bought a new pump. With the air lift working the pump on its installation will have a daily capacity of 3,000,000 gallons a day.

No posts to display