TUBE WELL FIRE HYDRANTS-

TUBE WELL FIRE HYDRANTS-

Our Minneapolis correspondent last week referred to tho tube well fire hydrants used in that city as auxiliary to the water supply. The writer has seen these tube well fire hydrants in operation, and can knowingly speak of their advantages to villages that are inadequately supplied with water. They are the ordinary tube well, so much used in this country for domestic and manulacturingpurposes. A “gang” of tubes, numbering from four to a dozen, as may be necessary, are driven into the ground at the intersection of streets, ten or twenty feet apart; when water is reached, the tubes are brought together in a common centre, in the shape of a hydrant. ‘Phis is made like an ordinary hydrant, to which a steam or hand engine may be connected to take suction. If water is found at any depth less than thirty feet, the engines have no difficulty in drawing a supply from them. Tho writer has seen a first-class steamer taking water from a four-well hydrant, and throwing two streams for four hours without there being any perceptible dimunition in the supply. Thero are many of these combination wells in use in the largo manufacturing establishments in this city and vicinity. By their use, their owners not only obtain an abundant supply of water, but save a heavy water tax to which they would otherwise be subjected. The Jlerald has one of these combination wells in the basement of its building, and the Western Union Telegraph building draws its water supply from twelve of these wells, the water being lifted by steam pumps to a tank on the roof, and thence distributed by pipes throughout tho building. For a cheap and satisfactory supply thero is nothing which can equal the tube well hydrants, always provided the soil admits of the driving of tube wells at all. They form a most ex-; eellent auxiliary to a regular water supply in cities possessing water works, but which have not adequate water mains put down. It costs but little to put down the tube wells, and thero are comparatively few places where they would not furnish an abundant water supply, V e hope to see them more generally used than they are at present. The idea is a Western one, and has not received much attention in other sections as yet.

No posts to display