Tulsa, Okla., Fire Report

Tulsa, Okla., Fire Report

FIRE STATION NO. 4. TULSA, OKLA.FIRE STATION NO. 3. TULSA, OKLA.

According to Gleen Condon in the Sunday World, of Tulsa, Okla., the fire department of that city in 1905 consisted of a chief, three firemen and a hose wagon. To-day there are in Tulsa four modern fire stations, representing an investment of $50,000, and equipment that cost $53,000, which is manned by 34 men. Tulsa was the first city in the State to install a telegraph fire alarm system, and the first to adopt automobile fire apparatus. By October 1, this year, there will not be a piece of horse-drawn apparatus in the city. Everything will be motor-propelled. Chief R. C. Alder, in the short space of eight years that he has been the head of the department, has made it one of the best equipped and most modern of any city in the country, population considered. The cost of maintenance is $1.35 per capita. The present apparatus consists of two auto pumping engines and hose wagons, one 175-foot motor aerial ladder truck, one chief’s auto wagon with 35-gallon chemical tank, two hose wagons, one three-horse hitch steamer and 2,500 feet of hose. At present there are 65 Gamewell fire alarm boxes. During last year the department made 141 runs. The value of property endangered by fire was $1,952,132, and the total loss was $13,926. The per capita loss was 49 cents. The monthly payroll amounts to $2,500. Chief Alder says he saves $5,100 annually on one piece of motor truck over what it formerly cost to maintain the same machine with horses. The total expense of running the department last year was $35,088. The fires during the year involved Property valued as follows: On buildings, $1,397,427; contents, $522,7u7; loss on buildings. $6,316; loss on contents, $7,(i|fi; total valuation, $l,9o2,134; total loss, $13,926.

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