Turret Pipes Installed on Motor Apparatus

Turret Pipes Installed on Motor Apparatus

We have read a great many articles pertaining to auto fire apparatus of all descriptions and their equipment, and still we fail to find one instance where any criticism has been made in such articles regarding installing “turret pipes on auto fire apparatus.” It would seem unwise to install a turret pipe in a piece of auto fire apparatus. We must remember that auto fire apparatus should always be kept at a safe and sane distance from any burning structure. Then it must be taken into consideration that up to the present time the auto fire apparatus has not fully substituted the horse-drawn fire apparatus, many cities having but one or two pieces of auto apparatus. In case of a large fire, or fire of less important nature, such auto apparatus in many cases could be used for scouting purposes, being able to cover the ground much quicker, not saying anything about the money invested in such a piece of apparatus. Should a wall or any portion of a building fall on it just think what the loss would he to tile city or to the department to which it belonged. Many chiefs are of the opinion that turret pipes should not be installed on horse-drawn or combination wagons, or hook and ladder trucks, especially in cities or villages where the number of pieces of apparatus is limited. When an apparatus is stationed at a fire and a number of hose lines are connected to a turret pipe installed on such a piece of apparatus, the apparatus is of no further use except to throw a large stream. In many cases in small departments such a wagon is sent back and reloaded with dry hose, hydrant wrench and a nozzle. This is done even at the time a fire is raging, as very often such rigs when reloaded assist, or are apt to assist, in responding to another call, or to the first call the second time, or they are used for scouting purposes. It seems ridiculous to install a turret pipe on a ladder truck, especially an aerial ladder. When once an aerial ladder is raised, as a rule, it remains for some time, owing to the many contrivances necessary for the safeguard of such a truck. If the ladder is not raised it is never known when it will be called upon, or in what position it may be placed.

Water towers are the proper places for turret pipes, and on high pressure wagons in large departments whete there is plenty of reserve equipment. Yes, even an extra wagon or two kept in reserve, loaded with hose, is a proper place for a turret pipe. But, for ordinary departments, not including our largest cities, a turret pipe mounted on two wheels with sufficient inlets is inexpensive to build, and the service of one or two such pipes, mounted on two wheels, is invaluable. Such a rig can easilv be secured when required, moved through alleys and placed in most any position without tying up or taking the chance of crippling a modern auto, or a useful piece of apparatus. It must not he misconstrued that turret pipes are not valuable. Large streams are always valuable, and no department, irrespective of size, should be without the use of large stream equipment.

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