TWENTIETH CENTURY FIRE STREAMS.

TWENTIETH CENTURY FIRE STREAMS.

The Eastman new nozzle system since its first introduction, but a few years ago, has met with continued success by its adoption in every section of the country. Its merits were at once recognised by the largest city departments, which adopted it as a necessity. They were soon followed by the smaller cities and manufacturing plants having fire protection. Since it was first placed on the market, neither pains nor expense have been spared in making many valuable improvements in it, wherever possible. The Eastman system furnishes superior streams in greater solidity and longer distances in over thirty different sizes, from the smallest in use up to ,vin. in diameter, and are operated from the ordinary facilities found in the average fire department, it has been so perfected that it meets almost every necessity in the most difficult and dangerous work of the firemen. It is much lighter and is put in operation more quickly than former methods. It is the most complete and practical plan for using all makes of shut-off nozzles and improving their streams. It enables one man safely and easily to direct his stream to any point of the compass under any pressures. It protects firemen from electric shocks. Its Deluge sets are cotlipact, taking up only about 6×20 ins. of space, with an average weight of forty lbs. The time required in putting these large streams in operation in trial tests has averaged thirty seconds. It may be added that these streams can he worked from any vantagepoint to which lines of hose can be carried; street alleyways, roofs of buildings, etc. Kwo-inch solid streams are guaranteed over 200 ft, under a pressure of 65 Ills. This system has largely reduct d the risk from all fires of any magnitude, and. in many instances has been tile direct means of largely reducing the rates of insurance It has its patrons so well pleased in every section of the country that hundreds of photographs have been sent the Kastman company at its factory.

Tobin, Tex., now has a fire department.

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