TWO FORTS ON FIRE AT ONCE.

TWO FORTS ON FIRE AT ONCE.

On Monday night a large quantity of dynamite stored in a frame building at the extreme northeastern corner of the Fort Wadsworth reservation, borough of Richmond, New York, took fire and illuminated the entire bay. No explosion took place. The stuff was stored in uncovered boxes in the frame structure, which was remote from all the others. The total loss was only about $1,500. The fire started at about 10 o’clock, and it was an hour before the Edgewater fire department was called. When the fire was first discovered by a man on guard, the commander turned out all the men at the post, and then hurried a special guard to South Beach to bring in all the men 011 evening leave there. As fast as they reported they took their fire station, but there was no water to fight the fire. Finally the firemen were called from Stapleton, and they laid long lines from Sea avenue and got some weak streams on the fire. The destruction of the budding and dynamite was complete. The spectacular part of the fire was increased by another fire, directly across the narrows, near Fort Hamilton. The blaze started in one of the stables of the United States Reservation at Fort Hamilton and spread so rapidly that at 1 o’clock a. m. next morning it was feared that the barracks and all the other government buildings would be destroyed. Quartered on the reservation are ten batteries of coast artillery and three batteries of light artillery. About 11 o’clock the men were aroused by the cry of fire. A strong wind fanned the flames until two stables and two gunsheds were burning. The stables were old ramshackle buildings, well dried, and burned with great rapidity. All of the buildings at the fort are old. It was said by those at the fort that they believed the fire was of incendiary origin. It started in four or five places in the stable at the same time. Some believe it was spite work against one of the officers who is a hard taskmaster, and consequently very unpopular with the men. When the alarm was given, the fire drill was sounded, and the soldiers hastened to the scene. As they were unable to accomplish anything, the fire department was called out. Three alarms were turned in, taking the engines from the whole southern district of Brooklyn. Before the fire could be brought under control the two stables and one gunshed were destroyed. It was feared at one time that it would spread to the amunition storehouse, but by hard work the firemen prevented this and brought it under control. One hundred and fifty horses and fifty-two mules which were released from one of the stables stampeded and created considerable excitement about the fort before they were caught. The damage amounts to about $40,000. The lower floor of one of the stables was used as a storeroom for uniforms and supplies and the other for a guardhouse. When the fire broke out the bars to the guardhouse were at once broken down to release the prisoners, all of whom helped in the work of fighting the fire. The gunshed destroyed belonged to the nth Field Battery. Only two heavy siege guns stored in it were destroyed.

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