Two of Three Indianapolis Elevator Buildings Saved

Two of Three Indianapolis Elevator Buildings Saved

Elevator B of the Cleveland Storage Company, located outside the city limits of Cleveland, Ohio, was discovered to be on fire by the night watchman recently and the man at once sent in a telephone alarm at 12:30 a. m. The elevator consisted of a group of three buildings, the engine and boiler rooms being of brick, the building containing the blower and storage bins of frame, and the tanks containing most of the grain of hollow tile. The fire originated on the top floor of the frame blower and storage bins building, 160 feet in height, from causes unknown, and owing to the distance from the nearest engine house had gained great headway before the arrival of the department, under command of Assistant Chief S. C. Hoyl, the building being almost entirely involved. There was only one 6-inch double hydrant available, and, owing to the distance from the city mains, no pressure direct from the plugs could be had. One of the two Ahrens-Fox pumpers of 700 gallons capacity was placed at the hydrant and the other 1,000 feet away from the plug, and thus a good stream was obtained, through 3,250 feet of hose, the nozzle being 1 1/4 inches. Besides the pumpers, there were three horsedrawn hose wagons and the assistant chief’s car present at the fire. The blower and storage bins, containing about 15,000 bushels of inferior corn and oats, were destroyed, but the other two buildings, containing the engine and boilers and grain, were saved, and the engine was uninjured. The tank building was 90 feet high and contained 18 tanks that held 25,000 bushels of grain each and 12 intermediate tanks that held 5,000 bushels each, there being a total of 125,000 bushels of grain all told, which was not injured. The value of the property was said to be $155,000, and the loss $50,000. The value of the contents was $35,000, with a loss of $15,000.

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