TYPHOID GIVES PHILADELPHIA MORE WORRY

TYPHOID GIVES PHILADELPHIA MORE WORRY

It has been hoped that since acquiring filtered water that the citizens of Philadelphia would be free from periodical epidemics of typhoid. That this hope has not been realized can only be attributed to the sheer negligence of someone in authority. Investigation by the Bureau of Health shows that quite a number of the large manufacturing concerns have in use a dual piping system, one carrying filtered water for domestic consumption, and the other carrying raw polluted river water for mill use. Water from both systems can be used alternately, and it is supposed that the polluted water has gained access to the public mains, with the effect that the mortality rates have been considerably increased during the past year through the prevalence of typhoid. It is noted that most ot the manufacturing plants .are in the infected districts, and the fact that there are few typhoid cases elsewhere can be accounted for by the water pressure in these areas being sufficient to withstand the counter pressure of the pumped river water. The only remedy for this, the Bureau of Health believes, is the complete physical severance of piping connected to the city mains, and piping carrying water from any other source, and this course will he taken. Examination of the records shows that the effluents from all the filtration plants to be free from infection, besides which the effluents are being treated with hypochlorite. The milk supply and various other common sources of infection have been studied without throwing material light on the problem, and the intermittent contamination shown by analysis of the water drawn from taps of city mains forces the above conclusion. Fortunately, however, the mild epidemic is on the wane, and the cause having been ascertained, the authorities expect to soon wipe it out altogether.

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