UP-TO-DATE FIRE TOOLS.

UP-TO-DATE FIRE TOOLS.

THE BEST PROVE NONE TOO GOOD FOR THE FIRE SERVICE.

The July number of Frank Leslie’s Monthly contains an illustrated article by former Chief Bonner, giving an interesting history and description of all the prominent fire tools now used in the New York fire department. Illustrations of powerful streams directed by children were shown as produced by the Eastman new nozzle system—one which is now not only used in every fire company in Manhattan borough, but is also being universally adopted by all the larger departments in the country.

The above cutis a reproduction from a photograph taken in Lewiston, Me., on huit June 12 The streams shown were all produced from an ordinary hydrant with eighty-five pounds pressure. Three solid streams were thrown simultaneously over 200 feet from nozzles of one and one-eighth, one and one-half, and one and three-quarter-inches in diameter. The streams were all perfect in formation, each independent in itself, and ail self-balancing—an exhibition never before seen or attempted in testing appliances for fighting fires. The illustration is certainly a valuable object lesson for the fire service. It makes the hydrant for effective work the equal of fully two steam fire engines where sufficient pressure is obtainable.

TEST OF EASTMAN NOZZLE AT DES MOINES, IA.

A prominent feature of the Eastman system is that all twist, thrash, and whirl is taken from the stream by the construction of the nozzle, to that extent that they are self-balanced while playing their streams, and easily stand alone without any help, as has been shown in other exhibitions. The system is covering every detail of lire work, making that which has been the most difficult and dangerous, the easiest and safest, and e pecially the onlv plan for the proper and safe handling of fire streams on ladders and roofs Streams are produced in all sizes from three-quarters of an inch to two and one-half inches in diameter, and, as hus already been stated, are easily delivered 200 feet and over from ordinary hydrants having eighty pounds pressure—formerly a one-inch stream thrown from 120 to 140 feet, has been considered satisfactory for distance. When fires reach large proportions, the best fire streams are not too good, or too easily handled. Firemen should, therefore, be provided with the best. The above cut shows best of all the advancement in fire streams that this new system has made.

TEST OF EASTMAN NOZZLE AT LEWISTON, ME.TEST OF EASTMAN NOZZLE AT GHENB, BELGUIM.

A photograph was taken by Secretary Dennan, of the lies Moines, la. Water company which is reproduced herewith. The exhibition took place on July 21, 1899, in front of the Observatory building, with a four-way Eastman Deluge set two and one-quarterinch nozzle, and a vertical stream was thrown a distance of 225 feet with a hydrant pressure of 120 pounds.

Another interesting test was made in Ghent, Belgium, where the same satisfactory results were obtained. The illustration shows anexhibition being made before the civic authorities on July 11, 1899. In addition to the above, the Eastman outfits have been forwarded to Bombay, India, and other foreign cities. A very flattering testimonial was received by the company from H. H. Thompson, city clerk of Napa, Cal. It says:

“Your Perfection holder and nozzles ordered by our city reached us in good condition. They were tried by the fire department, and found to be just as they were recommended. Our pressure is not great, but it demonstrates the fact that they are far superior to the nozzles we have in use. They give a much more solid stream, and throw a greater distance than any of the nozzles we have on hand. You may expect an order for at least three more in the near future.”

No posts to display