VALUE OF MOTOR APPARATUS DEMONSTRATED.

VALUE OF MOTOR APPARATUS DEMONSTRATED.

Again has the practical economy of motor fire apparatus been demonstrated by the simple and effective means of making a comparison of the maintenance cost of such apparatus and horse-drawn equipment. In Syracuse, N. Y., the Bureau of Fire has compiled some interesting figures indicating that in the past three years a saving at the rate of over $5,000 per year has resulted from installing motor apparatus, there being a saving of about $185 per year for every horse replaced by motor driven equipment and apparatus which would have required thirty horses having been installed in that time. Two companies which have been motorized have been taken as examples and the figures obtained are presented on another page of this issue. The motor apparatus of Engine Company No. 1 does the work of five horses, the maintenance cost of which would have come to $1,250, whereas the maintenance cost of the motor apparatus, for gasoline, other oil, etc., is estimated at $304 per year, making a saving on that one company of $1,046. The other company cited, Combination Company No. 1, which is equipped with motor apparatus which does the work of two horses, costing $500 a year, and the maintenance expense of the motor equipment is placed at $188.25 per-year, a saving of $311.75 per year. It is figured that there is a saving to the department of about $185 per year for every horse replaced by motor driven apparatus. There are now eight companies in Syracuse equipped with motor apparatus besides which the chief and four district chiefs have motor cars. The value of motor apparatus was also illustrated in a speech delivered by Mr. Janies J. Storrow, a banker, of Boston, Mass., and a member of the City Council, at a recent council meeting. Councilor Storrow said that the Fire Department is not being motorized fast enough and he admitted that he had made a mistake in voting last Spring to cut down from $90,000 to $75,000 the amount to be allowed this year for motorization. “This year I am in favor of giving more than $75,000 for motorization,” he said. “We do not appreciate the great conflagration risk there is in Boston. We are in a condition to have a fire four times as great as those in Chelsea and Salem under particular conditions. It is a very serious risk and one that is likely to get away from the Fire Department any day because of the dangerous conditions in this city. In Chelsea 18,000 were burned out in less than five minutes’ notice and here in Boston we may have 40,000 burned out in the same time.” These are just two of many recent illustrations of the constantly growing recognition of the advantages of motor fire apparatus.

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