Viewpoints

Viewpoints

THERE’S more to a fire than meets the eye.

  • Ask six newspaper reporters to cover a fire—and you’ll get six different viewpoints, and as many different stories.
  • That isn’t just because every fire has six sides—and it does—it is because none of us sees alike, thinks alike, reasons alike or writes alike.
  • That’s what complicates the job of editing an engineering Journal like FIRE ENGINEERING. We can’t treat every fire report from everybody’s viewpoint; about all we can do is research it, and we hope, present the story factually, and interestingly. And this calls for not only good reporting, but good researching! After research comes writing and editing, and then, perhaps re-writing and re-editing!
  • Not every fire account included in these pages gets the full six-sided treatment—after all, many reports are straight from the horse’s mouth—the fire chief who fought the fire! Most of our reports are from him and his chief officers. If they can’t give us the facts—who can? But other accounts are composites of many interests, many “reporters”—local observers, insurance rating men, news reporters, fire buffs, apparatus engineers, photographers and just plain “sidewalk chiefs.” But always, the last word is the fire chief or his assistants.
  • We like to think of FIRE ENGINEERING as the “last word” in journalistic, engineering research, editing and publishing. We know it isn’t. But we try to maintain the right perspective—the right viewpoint, the right sense of values—for our readers and advertisers alike.

Viewpoints

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Viewpoints

THE national presidential election is over. A lot of people found their viewpoints didn’t quite coincide with those of their fellowman.

  • Judging an engineering publication, especially one devoted to the big business of fire protection and prevention, is a bit like judging a candidate for office. There may be differences of viewpoint and opinion on questions of policy and publication.
  • Fortunately for FIRE ENGINEERING, however—if we are to judge by what its readers and advertisers—and other competent authorities say about it, the differences in opinion and viewpoint are so fine as to he almost negligible.
  • This unanimity of acceptance of its publishing policies, programs and principles, has endured for three-quarters of a century. In its 75 years this Journal has witnessed over a score of national elections; has seen presidents come and go; has weathered recessions and depressions as well as enjoyed tides of prosperity. It has seen the launching of hundreds of new fire departments, and the re-creation of hundreds of others.
  • Presidents and fire chiefs will come and go, but the nation’s fire service will endure—will continue to grow, to go forward, to improve.
  • The vote seems to he pretty unanimous that FIRE ENGINEERING will also continue to serve and support this fire service through those future presidential administrations.