VILLENEUVE HOSE WASHER, HOISTER AND REELER.*

VILLENEUVE HOSE WASHER, HOISTER AND REELER.*

THE machine shown in the accompanying illustrations is a most useful time-saving and economical invention for lire departments. A FIRE AND WATER representative was recently shown one in operation at the headquarters of the Pittsfield (Mass.) Department.

The test was made with a pressure of about forty pounds of water supplied to the motor, and the hose was washed with great thoroughness and rapidity, taken up to the tower and afterwards tightly reeled without any process other than moving the brake of the motor to set the chain in motion. The cut No. r shows a front view, and No. 2 a rear view of the machine. It stands about three feet high and occupies very little space. Inside the case are eleven feet of ij-inch iron steam pipe coiled around it and leaving a space of ten inches in diameter. This pipe is perforated so that a strong spray is thrown on the hose while it is drawn through the case. On one side is a water motor, bolted to the case and the platform on which this stands. A piece of hose is run from a hydrant and attached to the supply-pipe of the motor through which the water is taken that furnishes the motive power. There are four boxes also attached to the case, which hold two shafts ; the upper one being the reeling shaft, while the lower, provided with a clutch gear, a brake wheel and a grooved pulley, drives an endless chain.

George Viileneuve, ta Third street, Pittsfield, Mass.

FIG. 1.FIG. 2.

In the rear view is shown the brake supply-pipe with valve, which is also connected with the pipe of the motor.

The length of hose to be washed is attached to a chain two feet long, and this is hooked to the endless chain. The motor is then started and the hosd is drawn through the case from the bottom, where the perforated pipe plays a strong current on it, thus washing it thoroughly. The chain then takes the hose up to the drying tower or along any horizontal fixture used for this purpose, where it is allowed to remain until dry, and is then neatly reeled as shown in the cut. At the bottom of the machine is an outlet pipe which can be connected with the sewer to carry off the used water. A a-inch pipe is required for supplying the motor and hose washer.

The chief advantages claimed for this machine are compactness and such simplicity of its parts as to render derangement difficult. The thoroughness of its work was seen in the several lengths of perfectly coiled hose washed with it, which looked as fresh as if they had just come from the factory, the sand and dirt being completely removed. The machine will wash 100 feet of hose perfectly clean in one minute, and it can be used in any fire station where hose is washed and dried.

NEW WATER-WORKS AND IMPROVEMENTS.

(Special Reports to FIRE AND WATER.)

from the twelfth annual report of the Lawrence (Mass.) water board for 1887, just received, is taken the following : In June, 1887, Arnold H. Salisbury was promoted from the position of assistant superintendent tothe place of Mr. Rogers, resigned. Total receipts for year, $86,360.29 ; expenses, $38,184.78 ; balance to credit. $48,175.51. Cost of construction of works to January 1,1887, $r,924,015.32 ; expended during year, $116,184.78. Deducting income tor year, this leaves a net cost for works to December 3t, 1887. of $1,953,839.81.

The Slate Board of Health has made extensive preparations near the lower locks to experiment upon the filtration of sewage, to see if it is practicable, and under what circumstances to turn the sewage of a city upon any of the sands or soils of the valley, and so purify it that the water flowing through the sand will be suitable to turn into a drinking water stream. Comparing the water before and after filtration by the ammonias they contain, the following table shows the results obtained for two weeks :

The water passing through muck has its impurities doubled ; through river silt, slightly increased in total amount ; and through garden soil which had in previous years been manured, multiplied ten times in total amount ; while the sands, and successive layers of soil, loam, sand and gravel, give waters containing less than one quarter of the impurities of the city water, and having a clear, bright appearance, comparing favorably with the filtered and driven well waters of Brookline, Cohasset, Hyde Park, Kingston, Revere, Ware, Wellsley and Woburn.

The number of feet of pipe laid during the year was 6580 ; number of miles of pipe on entire works, 53.64 ; total number of hydrants. 496 ; gates, 675 ; drinking fountains, 16 ; meters, 918 ; of which 132 were added during the year, 576 of the whole being Crown meters. Cubic feet of metered water, 25,419,700; revenue for same, $27,045.66; number of water takers, 10,684; number of days pumping, 314; coal consumed for all purposes, 1,430,000 pounds. Water board : Joseph E. Watts, president ; John Breen, David Cahill, Jesse Moulton, W. W. Dean ; superintendent, A. II. Salisbury; water registrar, Herbert F. Whittier ; inspector, Michael A. McCormick ; engineer at pumping station, Martin R. Sawyer ; foreman of piping and repairs, Edward Lee.

THE GALVESTON WATER-WORKS CONTRACT.

THERE were about eighty bids opened by the Board of Water Commissioners, Galveston, Tex., on the r6th inst. for the new waterworks system, for which the city was authorized to issue bonds to the amount of $450,000. The bids were :

ENTIRE WORK IN THE Aggregate.—McRae, Lally & Son, Detroit, Mich., $427,145, exclusive of wells; J. W. Byrnes & Co., Galveston! $476,808.67, without wells ; Moffat, Hodgins & Clarke, Watertown, N.’ V., 435,000; Denison & Cowell, Muscatine, la., entire work, except stand-pipe, tanks and wells, $348,000 ; with pipes laid with two-foot covering. $331,800.

PUMPING Engines.—Moffett, Hodgins * Clarke, two 5,000,000 gallons with boiler, $60,780 ; two 4,000,000 gallons with boilers, $57,000. Ricker, Lee & Co., Knowles patent, 5,000,000 and boilers, $66,000 ; 4,000,000 and boilers, $40,000; 3,000,000 and boilers, $34,000. For Deane pumps with boilers, $55,000, $42,080 and $39,930; without boilers, $43,950, $30,950 and $24,825. Dearie Steam Pump Company, Holyoke, Mass., 5,000 000 without boilers, $43,950; 4,000,000. $30 950; 3,000,000, $24,825. George F. Blake Manufacturing Company, 5,000,000 without boilers, $54,000; 4,000,000, $28,000; 3,000,000, $22,000. Henry R. Worthington, two 3,000.000 compound condensing, $21,600: two high duty, $31,450; 4,000,000, $29,800, $46,000 ; two 5,000,000, $49,600 and $62,000 respectively. Six boilers Knowles Steam Pump Company, New York; two 5,000,000 boilers, etc., complete, $64,000 ; two 4,000,000, $38,000, 24-inch stroke ; same with 36-inch stroke, $45,000 ; 3,000,000 complete, $35,500, 24-inch stroke ; same with 18-inch stroke, $32,500, without boilers and fixtures; 5,000,000, $53,000:4.000,000, $27,000; with 36-inch stroke, $34,000; 3,000,000, $24,500; with 18-inch stroke, $21,500. Gordon & Maxwell, Hamilton, O., 5,000,000, foundation, suction, etc., $47,500, and with attached air pumps and condensers; without, $41,400; 4,000,000, same conditions, $36,200 and $29.400; 3.000,000, same conditions, $29,400 and $24900. Jackson Foundry and Machine Company, Jackson, Mich., 5,000000 complete with boilers, $65,000; 4,000,000, $39000; 3,ooo,odo. $33,000 ; without boilers, $54,000, $28,000 and $22,000 respectively. Holly Manufacturing Company, Lockport, N. Y., specification A, 5,000,000, including foundations, etc., $23,800 each ; B. $r7,ooo each ; C, $12,800 each ; D, $20,500; E, $10,500; F, $14,700 ; G, $11,700; H, $6,300, or one or more Gaskell pumping engine, compound condensing, complete, $28,500.

PIPE AND SPECIAL Castings.—Mellert Foundry’and Machine Company. Reading, Pa.; R. D. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; and McNeal Pipe and Foundry Comnany. Gloucester Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pa.; Shickle, Harrison & Howard Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo.; Walker, Fowler & McVitie, Galveston, Tex.; Warren Foundry and Machine Company; Moffett. Hodgkins & Clark; Ricker, Lee & Co.; National Tube Works Company, Chicago, Ill.

VALVES AND Hydrants.—Walter S. Payne & Co., Fostoria, O.; Daniel Kennedy, New York, N. Y.; R. D. Wood & Co.; Ludlow Manufacturing Company, Troy, N. Y.; Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Mass.; Moffett, Hodgkins & Clarke ; Ricker, Lee & Co.; Eddy Valve Company, Waterford, N. Y.; Holyoke Hydrant and Iron Works, Holyoke, Mass.; Louis Schwartz, New Orleans, La.; Holly Manufacturing Company ; Galvin Brass and Iron Company, Detroit, Mich.; Gloucester Iron Works; Johnson Foundry and Machine Company ; Mellert Foundry and Machine Company; Bingham & Taylor, Buffalo,

STAND-PIPE AND TWO STORAGE Tanks.—Jackson Foundry and Machine Company, Jackson, Mich.; L. B. Stevens, Toledo, O.; Union Iron Works Company, Chattanooga, Tenn.; the Shickle, Harrison & Howard Iron Company, St. Louis, Mo.; Thomas & Gorman, Houston, Tex.; Tippett & Wood, Phillipsburg, N. J.; J. B. Bostwick, Galveston, Tex.; Moffett, Hodgkins & Clark ; Ricker, Lee & Co.

SUPPLY WELLS. — Louis Seigel, New York, without guaranty ; J. L. Smith Mexia, Tex.; J. W. Byrnes, Galveston, Tex.

BUILDINGS AND Chimney.—L. B. Stevens, Toledo, O.; Harry Devlin, Galveston, Tex.; Ricker, Lee & Co.

Contracts were awarded as follows :

PUMPING Engines.—Knowles Steam Pump Company, New York. Boilers.—Union Iron Works Company, Chattanooga, Tenn., four boilers for $5500.

PIPE AND SPECIAL CASTINGS AND Hydrants.—R. D. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 24 and 20-inch pipe, $28 ; 16-inch, $28.20; 12 and 10inch, $29.90; 8 and 6.inch, $30.60; castings, 265-100 cents; hydrants, $33.10 each.

LAYING Pipe.—H. Merigold & Co., Lima, O., whose bid for this work was as follows: 24-inch, 54 cents ; 20-inch, 48 cents ; 16-inch, 36 cents ; 12-inch, 27 cents ; 10-inch, 24 cents : 8-inch, 17 cents; 6-inch, 15 cents. Valve boxes and covers, $5 each. For 2-foot covering, 5 per cent less than above figures.

VALVE BOXES AND Covers.—Bingham & Taylor, Buffalo, N. Y., 24 and^ 20-inch boxes, $4.75 ; 16, 12 and 10-inch, $3.85 ; 8 and 6-inch, $3.45.

Valves.—Eddy Valve Company, Waterford, N. Y., 24-inch, with gearing, $180; 20-inch gearing, $109; 16-inch gearing, $70; 12-inch, $36; 10-inch, $27 ; 8-inch, $50.25 ; 6 inch, $13.44 each.

BUILDINGS AND Chimneys.—L. B. Stevens, Toledo, O., $21,500. BUILDING FOUNDATIONS, STAND-PIPE AND Tanks.—Same bidder. STAND-PIPE AND TANKS. — Moffett, Hodgkins & Clarke, Watertown, N. Y., stand-pipe. $17,206 ; storage tanks, $11,668.

The supply of pipe for forty miles has been reduced to bring estimate within the limit of bond issue. The contract for wells was not awarded, and will be readvertised.

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