WATER IMPROVEMENTS RECOMMENDED FOR SEATTLE.

WATER IMPROVEMENTS RECOMMENDED FOR SEATTLE.

In making the recommendation in his annual report that additional reservoirs be constructed within the limits of the city of Seattle, Wash:, and that Swan lake be utilized as an impounding reservoir with the ultimate object of substituting a concrete and steel line for the Cedar river wood stave pipe, City Engineer Dimock stated as follows: “It is becoming increasingly clear that the city should avail itself of Swan lake as an impounding reservoir. The watershed tributary to this lake amounts to about 3,000 acres, none of which is suitable for cultivation, and which might be acquired at a comparatively nominal expense. The construction of two small dams would raise the waters of this lake about twenty feet and impound a sufficient supply to last the city from four to five months. It so happens that the large breaks of 1911 and the present breaks are between Swan lake and the intake. If we had Swan lake in both of these emergencies, we would have had an ample su*’~’” of water; no citizen would have suffered any inconvenience, and the break would have received mention in the smallest possible paragraph in the newspapers. The ultimate project should properly include the substitution for the wood stave pipe from the intake to Swan lake of a concrete aqueduct canable of carrying say from 100,000,000 to 150,000,000 gallons per day, or a supply for 1,000,000 persons. The construction, however, of such an aqueduct might well be deferred for a considerable length of time, inasmuc’ a :r> break in the pipe lines between these two points could readily be repaired long before the storage in Swan lake would be exhausted. It is possible, however, that a disastrous break might occur in the pipe lines between Swan lake and the city. It is here that attention should be concentrated on substituting for the present lines a more permanent and durable construction. A portion of these lines might well be built of concrete, but the larger length would have to be of steel. In addition to the substitution of more Permanent material for the existing pipe lines and the acquisition of Swan lake, additional reservoirs should be constructed within the city limits. It is absolutely essential that the Volunteer park reservoir should be enlarged to not less than twice its present capacity by constructing a second basin. Furthermore, the Lincoln park reservoir should be extended to cover the entire site now owned by the city. This would more than double its present capacity. Because of the fact that this reservoir is surrounded by a more or less completely built-up district, it is extremely desirable that it be covered. If this be done the top of the reservoir may be used for park and playground purposes, giving them double their present area, or it might be used as the site for a great municipal auditorium. Both these reservoirs should be constructed with double basins for convenience in cleaning and as an additional precaution in avoiding shortage. West Seattle should also be provided with reservoir and standpipes so that it would not be dependent upon a single line of pipe crossing the West waterway.” Some time ago Water Superintendent L. B. Youngs recommended that the question of issuing $3,000,000 in bonds for water system improvements be submitted to the voters at the election in March, the Rainier valley, the West Seattle district and part of the northern section of the city being in need of an improved service. The principal improvements proposed by Superintendent Youngs to be made from the bond issue are: A third pipe line extending from the intake at Lansburg to the city. Two reservoirs in West Seattle, a low and high service, and a main extending from the low service reservoir back to the big main at Spokane street. A second reservoir in Volunteer Park, immediately north of the present reservoir, with a capacity of 60,000,000 gallons. A standpipe at Thirty-sixth avenue Southwest and West Othello street in West Seattle. Two standpipes along Beacon avenue south of the city and along the pipe lines. A standpipe at Maple Leaf reservoir at the north city limits. Pumping station at Green Lake reservoir, near the north city limits. A pumping station at the low service reservoir in West Seattle connecting with the proposed standpipe in Thirtysixth avenue southwest and West Othello street.

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