WATER NOTES FROM SOUTH AFRICA.

WATER NOTES FROM SOUTH AFRICA.

Specially written for FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING

CAPE TOWN, June 5, 1904.

Of all the British possessions South Africa can least afford to suffer from a lack of water. The trouble in this respect has been acute at Cape Town, but it has been met, and the city’s supply has been assured. The new reservoir has been built on Table Mountain. Yet there are those who shake their heads sadly, and look knowing as they remind the public that, when the Woodhead reservoir was first completed, it was confidently predicted that Cape Town’s water supply was assured for the future. Events proved otherwise, and they claim it might be so again. The total existing sources of supply are only equal to satisfying a demand of about 3,500,000 gallons per day for 200 days, and calculations based upon the growth of the city and suburban municipalities during the last eleven years go to show that in five years’ time the daily demand will not be far short of 8.000,000 gallons. A new supply, therefore, must be had, and, as it will take well on to five years before it could be available, no time should be lost in setting about the work. The Frenchhoek scheme has been most favorably reported upon by hydraulic engineers. It involves going fifty-six miles off for the water, and will cost $9,250,000—most probably $10,000,000, and a daily supply of 40,000,000 gallons, it is estimated, will be secured. The waste of water in the city is preposterous and calls for compulsory meterage. Yet there a daily waste goes on, through the natural resources of the locality not being availed of. After every rainfall water that should be impounded runs down the slopes of Table Mountain, and all through the year there is an accumulation of water in Stinkwater ravine. It is also positively asserted by engineers that there is a vast amount of water stored in the heart of the mountain, which could be diverted into reservoirs cut and cross-cut through the mountain, and would be perfect receptacles for water storage, being protected from the sun’s rays and the natural evaporation. And even if this water were not fit for domestic purposes, might it not be used for power? There is also the Orange Kloof catchment area below the tunnel in the direction of Hout bay, where a reservoir could be constructed to furnish us with an additional daily supply of 200,000 gallons. If this were shared with Wynberg, there would still be enough for both, and a plentiful supply from such sources would do away altogether with the cistern systems.—During March last Port Elizabeth had a plentiful supply of water. The storage reservoir water averaged about three feet four and one-half inches below sill—24450,000 gallons. and the rainfall was good. The water registered by main meters near pumping station 4,263,000 gallons: average daily consumption, 568,857 gallons; total consumption, 3,982,000 gallons. The ipunip worked always except when the pump dam overflowed.—Durban provides 5,000.000 gallons a day for its 70,000 inhabitants—a per capita allowance of nearly seven and one-half gallons per day.

Chief Musham, of Chicago, plans to convert the hose comnanies at Hegewisch and Austin into engine companies, with fire engines. These companies, if money can be found for the purpose, will be known as 96 and 97.

WATER NOTES FROM SOUTH AFRICA.

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WATER NOTES FROM SOUTH AFRICA.

A Capetown, South Africa, correspondent writes as follows: “There will soon be several openings in South Africa for the sale of various equipment for water supply and drainage systems. It is pro posed to increase the water supply at Port Elizabeth. A dam having a capacity of 70,000,000 gallons is to be constructed across the valleys of the Sand and Palmiet rivers at an estimated cost of nearly $130,000. Another dam is to be built across the Bulk river valley. Its capacity will he 50,000,000 gallons. The cost is calculated at $115,000. Nearly forty miles of Siemens-Martin steel piping, varying from nine inches to eighteen inches in diameter, will he purchased. The value of the contract will be alxout $620,000. A 1,500,000-gallon capacity reservoir is planned to be built in St. George’s Park, at an estimated cost of $67,500. For filter beds $96,000 will be appropriated. 1 he scheme will involve an expenditure in all of about $1,250,000.— The Woodstock municipality, CapeColony, will complete street improvements and extend the sewer system at a calculated expenditure of $50,000.—A hill has been passed authorising the municipal authorities of Maritzburg to provide a drainage system for that place. It provides for the sewerage of the streets on the water carriage principle and for septic tanks and bacteria beds. The system will be complete, and will involve a call for a large number of sanitary appliances and material. The approximate prices of drain pipe made in that locality are $30.64 per 1,000 for two-inch and $45.97 per 1,000 for three-inch pipe. At these prices the supply is reported to be limited.—The town council at Mowbray, Cape Peninsula, contemplates the construction of storm water and drainage banks, at a cost of $390,000.—Plans and specifications have been drawn up for a water supply system to be built at Vryheid. to cost about $80,000.—The Natal Public Works department is calling for tenders for constructing a service reservoir and weir, with the necessary pipings and fittings, in connection with the projected water supply installation at Eshowe. Zululand. This is only a portion of the complete plan.—Plans have been drawn up for a water supply system at Standerton, Transvaal. The completion of the construction work will mean an expense of about $150,000.—The town council of East London will raise $3,750,000 with which to carry out its supplementary water supply plans and other purposes

The Crater Land Reservoir company is desirous of leasing the city pipe lines of Colorado Springs. Colo. It seems as if in the future the city were to be supplied with water from a separate system by private parties.