Water Plans for Wilmette

Water Plans for Wilmette

The growth of the population of Wilmette, Ill., has been rapid. Since July 1st, 1892, Wilmette has purchased its water from Evanston, being served through a 12-inch pipe, which delivers it at the border. For two a change seems desirable to many Wilmette residents. The existing contract under which Evanston has been serving Wilmette with water at 6 cents per 1,000 gallons, expires next July and Wilmette has been notified that if the service is continued the price will be 8 cents per 1,000 gallons. In recent years the growth of population has been so large that Evanston has not been able to maintain sufficient pressure through the 12lnch main to keep it at sixty pounds. It became necessary for Wilmette to put in booster pumps, which are located in the pumping station of the sanitary district at Wilmette and operated by electricity, in order to get water at some remote taps. Mr. Dabney H. Maury, consulting engineer, w’as engaged to make a survey and report upon its water service and recommendations regarding its improvements. That report has been completed and outlines three plans. It states that taking water from an artesian well supply sunk to the Potsdam sandstone level or directly from the lake by a water pumping system of its own, would give a permanent supply of good water at a much lower cost than they are now it from Evanston Mr. Maury figures that in order to make the Evanston supply as cheap as the cheapest they could substitute, Evanston would have to furnish the water to Wilmette at a price ot 3.86 cents per 1,000 gallons. Regarding the well system, he says the water would be excellent. It would be cool and palatable and its temperature would remain about the same the year around. It would, however, be harder than the lake water and it was just possible might contain iron in objectionable quantities and that the supply would not always be what it is now. If the supply should be taken from the lake it is pointed out that Wilmette has the best point on the shore south of Waukegan to take water from. Mr. Maury estimates the Wilmette population at about 7,300 now and at the rate of growth of the last few years that it will reach 12,000 in another twelve years and that they must provide a water supply for that number. Wilmette is all metered, and with the meters they use about seventy-five gallons per capita a day. The third and cheapest plan recommended is taking the supply from the lake, using oil engines to do the pumping. He says that the quality of the Evanston supply is as good as any that Wilmette could possibly obtain and suggests negotiations looking toward Wilmette endeavoring to get a cheaper rate from this city and, failing in that, to build its own water works at a cost of about $150,000.

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