Water Report of Hamilton

Water Report of Hamilton

The report of City Engineer E. R. Gray, of Hamilton, Ont., Can., which covers two years, and includes the water works and engineering departments of that city, shows that the population of Hamilton on December 31st, 1917, was 107,832; the acreage, 6,450; the assessed value, $82,704,840; there are 992,905 feet of water mains of all sizes in Hamilton, 1,835 hydrants and 1,634 valves. A waterworks appraisal is being prepared and when complete will enable the department to calculate more readily the cost of water. It is expected that the 10,000,000 Imperial gallon, steam-turbinedriven, centrifugal pumping unit being made for the city by the Turbine Equipment Company, Toronto, will be delivered in December, 1918. The 10,000,000-Imperial-gallon, motor-driven, centrifugal pumping unit has been awarded to the same company, who are agents for the De Laval Steam Turbine Company, of Trenton, N. J., and will be installed at a later date. The water consumption of Hamilton is still increasing. The average pumpage, 127 Imperial gallons of water per 24 hours per capita, is considerably higher than the average consumption by American cities and almost twice the consumption by cities where the services are metered. Some statistics regarding the consumption of water are as follows: Average daily consumption, 13,689,012 gallons; gallons per day to each customer, 127.8. During the year extensions to the water mains totalled 5,388 feet. The cost of repairs per mile during 1917 was $33.06. The average head pumped against during the year 1917 was 260.01 feet, as against 258.52 feet for 1916. The maximum total head for 24 hours was 283.77 feet, on April 18. The maximum pumpage for 24 hours was 19,112,400 gallons, on July 30. The minimum pumpage for 24 hours was 9,921,340 gallons, on November 9th. Average pressure on mains was 106.83 pounds as against 103.29 pounds jn 1916. The total pumpage for 1917 was 4,996,489,493 gallons as compared with 4,474,711,870 for 1916, a daily increase of 1,429,527 gallons. Monthly inspections and reports are made by the mechanical and electrical engineer in regard to all pumping equipment in the various stations. Mr. Gray recommends the construction of a duplicate supply main from the Ferguson avenue high-level pumping station to the Jolley Cut, at an estimated cost of $3,000. He also urges that some action be taken to determine the cost of power supplied for pumping purposes at the Beach pumping station, the last definite statement received having been dated February, 1916. The department is preparing a complete and accurate record of all waterworks valves in the city, so that anyone will be able to locate a desired valve. Due to the unusual severity of the weather, great difficulty was experienced during the past winter with frozen water services, over 350 services having been thawed out, chiefly by electricity. The expense in connection with this work amounted to about $2,000. The apparatus is privately owned. Mr. Gray recommends the purchase of such apparatus by the city at an estimated cost of $1,600.

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