Water Situation at Washington

Water Situation at Washington

That the action of the House recently in passing the Zihlman bill looking toward an increase in Washington’s water supply does not come too soon is borne out by figures of water consumption in the District just compiled by the water department. October 1 the consumption of water reached 65,490,030 gallons, and on October 2, 66,521,320 gallons. The estimated safe daily capacity in the conduit i65,000,000. With the exception of Sundays, there has not been a single day since the first of June when consumption of water in the District has not exceeded the safe limit of 65,000,000 gallons. The bill which was passed was offered by Representative Frederick N. Zihlman, of Maryland, and provides an appropriation of $15,000 for a survey of the water situation, to be made by a commission of five members, three of whom shall be selected from the Corps of Engineers of the United States army, one from the Washington suburban sanitary commission. and one from the engineering department of the Government. District Engineer Commissioner Knight said that under the most favorable circumstances it probably would not be possible for the investigation to be made and the work of providing an increased supply completed under three years. He said it was of the most vital importance for the Senate to pass the bill with the least possible delay, in order that an investigation may be started at once. Superintendent Garland of the District water department declared that Washington may experience a water shortage before the new supply is provided unless the most rigid economy in the use of water is practiced by all citizens, and especially by the District and Federal Governments. He said there is no estimating the present population of Washington, or how large it will be next summer, but at the present rate of increase in population, a serious water shortage may be experienced next summer unless everybody unites in a determined effort to save water wherever possible. Mr. Garland made a special appeal to all householders to refrain from using water on sidewalks. He said that leaves and other debris should be removed with brooms instead of being washed off, the latter practice being generally resorted to.

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