WATER SUPPLY.

WATER SUPPLY.

Contractors and municipal officers will find it to their advantage to read the contracting intelligence in FIRE AND WATER every week. More items of interest to city and town authorities will be found in its columns than in any similar class paper published in the country. The subscription is only $t per year, $1 for four months.

  • Allison, Ia., wants water-works.
  • Mott, Cal., will have water-works.
  • Herington, Kan., will have water-works.
  • Hummelstown, Pa., will have water-works.
  • Norwalk, O., will increase its water supply.
  • Sparta, Wis., wants a pump for fire protection.
  • A company will bore artesian wells at Wilton, la.
  • Milwaukee, Wis., will lay additional water mains.
  • Lexington, Va., thinks of enlarging its water-works.
  • Jeffersonville, Ind., is threatened with a water famine.
  • Millbury, Mass., wants a water supply from Worcester.
  • Aberdeen, Dak., talks of sinking another artesian well.
  • Lockport, Ill., contemplates the erection of water-works.
  • Dr. Kendrick will sink an artesian well at Anthony, Fla.
  • Lynn, Mass., will supply Saugus with water for five years.
  • Clinton, Wis., will construct a $6500 water-works system.
  • B. Walker will construct water-works at Millcdgcville, Ga.
  • Seneca, S. C., is agitating the construction of water-works.
  • Bayfield, Wis., has contracted for a system of water-works.
  • The Mexico (Mo.) water-works contract has been annulled.
  • Surveys are being made for water works at Greenville, Miss.
  • The Green Bay (Wis.) council has accepted the water-works.
  • The flood damage at Augusta, Ga., is estimated at $1,575,000.
  • Lapere, Mich., will have water-works. Address C. G. White.
  • Water-works and an artesian well are talked of at Ponca, Neb,
  • A system of water-works will be constructed at Kewanee, Ill.
  • Kilbourn, Wis., is considering the construction of water-works.
  • Franklin, Mass,, is sinking an artesian well for the water-works.
  • Anderson, Ind., and Bucyrus, O., will extend their water mains. East Stoughton, Mass., is discussing the question of water-works.
  • The plant of the water-works at Rome, N. Y., is being improved.
  • The Pawnee City (Neb.) Board of Trade favors the establishment of water-works and an electric light plant, E. F. Hempstead, C._E. Casey
  • and J. R. Pool were last week appointed as a committee to investigate the cost.
  • Faulkton, Dak,, will issue bonds for $5000 for sinking an artesian well.
  • An artesian well at Geneseo, III., has struck water at a depth of 2055 feet.
  • Minonk, III., will expend $10,000 for water-works. Address the 51 ;iyor.
  • The water-works trustees of Columbus, O., propose enlarging their plant.
  • — Marysville, Kan., talks of issuing bonds for constructing waterworks.
  • Sidney, O., proposes to expend $80,000 in improving its water supply.
  • The idea of constructing water-works at Rushford, Minn., has been abandoned.
  • O. I„ Packard of Milwaukee will construct water-works at Rhinelander, Wis.
  • C. D. Barstow of Muncie, Ind., is constructing the water works at Merrill, Wit.
  • Anaconda, W. T., and Grand Junction, Col., will probably construct water-work s.
  • Dr. D. A. Smith, Anthony, Fla., invites proposals for sinking an artesian well.
  • Madison, Wis., is considering the advisability of taking water from Lake Monona.
  • The Crookston (Minn.) Water Power and Light Company will improve its plant.
  • Water-works are talked of at Oakland, Cal. J. H. Woodward can give information.
  • Canton, Mass,, has voted to construct water works. Address the water commissioners.
  • Denver, Col., is discussing the water-works question. The cost is estimated at $150,000.
  • Artesian wells will be sunk at Norwalk, O., as the present water supply is insufficient.
  • Marshall, Tex., wants bids for the construction of water-works. See advertisement elsewhere.
  • Hastings, Neb., will vote upon the question of issuing $15,000 bonds for additional water mains.
  • The Artesian Water Company will furnish Memphis, Tenn., with a supply of water from wells.
  • The Ottawa, Out., water-works system will be extended so as to supply the experimental farm.
  • Waco, Tex., will issue $15,000 in bonds to build the water-works announced in a previous issue.
  • Greensboro, N. C., wants bids for a system of water-works on the franchise plan. See advertisement.
  • Water-works will be constructed at Beaumont, Tex., to cost about $14.ocx). Bids open until August 15.
  • Sheffield, Eng., has bought the water-works from the company heretofore operating them for $10,000,000.
  • A. A, Richardson, C. F.., of Lincoln, Neb,, is preparing plans for water works at David City and Loupe City.
  • Chelsea, Mass., has appropriated $1180 for the improvement of the water service in the Marginal street district.
  • The time for the reception of bids for constructing water-works at Crete, Neb., has been extended to September 6.
  • Superintendent Hamilton of the Toronto (Onf.) water-works, has prepared a plan for a new reservoir on Well’s Hill.
  • Address J. W. Caldwell for information as to the water-works and electric light plant to be constructed at Wytheville, Va.
  • Medicine I.odge, Kan., voted August 4 upon the question of issuing $15,000 bonds for water-works. Result as yet unknown.
  • It is rumored that Oshkosh, Wis., will purchase the water-works plant now owned by a few citizens and valued at $340,000.
  • The Peabody (Mats.) Water Board has served notice on Salem, terminating all agreements in regard to use of water and pipes,
  • R. D. Wood & Co. of Philadelphia, Pa., have the contract for pipe and special castings for the Kittanning reservoir at Altoona, Pa.
  • At East port, Me., it has been found impossible to get an adequate supply of water from wells for the proposed system. An abundant supply can be procured from Boyden’s lake, but this would involve the lay-
  • ing of seven or eight miles of pipe, and a much greater outlay than was anticipated, and the matter remains in abeyance.
  • The Butte and Yuba Orange Belt Irrigating Canal Company of Oroville. Cal., has been incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000.
  • The Mexia (Trx.) Ice, Water and Light Company has been incorporated by D. M. Pendergast and others. Capital stock, $30,000.
  • H. W. R. Coates, city engineer of Kalamazoo, Mich., estimates the cost of repairing the water-works at Lafayette, Ind., at $43,500.
  • The proposed enlargement of the Toronto (Ont.) water supply by means of the Mimico water would, it is estimated, cost $1,000,000.
  • Owing to some trouble concerning the new city charter the waterworks at Fernandina, Fla., will not be constructed for the present.
  • Austin, Minn., proposes to procure its domestic water supply from artesian wells. The Cedar river water will be used for fire purposes.
  • Washburn, Wis., has awarded a contract for water-works on the Ilolly system, including three miles of mains, to John Dickenson of Chicago.
  • The Worthington Hydraulic Works have furnished four pumping engines of 5,000,000 gallons capacity each, to the St. Louis water-works.
  • The Spring Hill Water Company of Seattle, W. T., is building a 4,000,000-gallon reservoir on Ridge Lawn. New pumps are to be erected.
  • At Clinton, Ill., an abundant supply of water has been found at a depth of fifty-one feet. Work on the new water-works system will begin at once.
  • The American Water-works and Guarantee Company (limited) of Pittsburgh, Pa., has been granted a franchise for water-works at North Platte, Neb.
  • George FI. Daniel, city clerk of Osceola, Mo., writes FIRE AND WATER that the discussion of water-works for that place has been dropped for the present.
  • Mankato, Minn., voted last week upon the question bf issuing $20,000 water-works bonds. A tie was the result, 448 votes having been cast each way.
  • W. R. Coates of Kalamazoo, Mich., will make plans for waterworks improvements at Benton Harbor and St. Joseph, Mich., and West Superior, Wis.
  • Work has begun on the new reservoir at St. Paul, Minn. It will be at an elevation of 320 feet, and will be of a capacity of 15,000,000 to 20,000,000 gallons.
  • The sum of $216,712.39 was paid for Croton water rents in New York last week. The five per cent additional tax on unpaid bills would have been charged this week.
  • The establishment of a high pressure water service for additional fire protection is being discussed at Manchester, N. H. General Charles Williams is interested.
  • Marinette, Wis., having rejected all the proposals received July 2 for water-works, is endeavoring to arrange with the Menominee Water Company for a supply.
  • Thos. C. Basshor & Co. of Baltimore, Md., will put up a stand-pipe for the Catonsville Water Company, 25 x 50 feet and of 185,000 gallons capacity. It will cost $6000.
  • TheVolker& Felthousen Manufacturing Company has contracts for pumping machinery for the water-works at San Jose, Cal. ; Garden City, Great Bend, Oswego and Marion, Kan.
  • The city council of St. Cloud, Minn., rejected all bids for the purchase of the water-works. A modified proposal was made later by E. T. Sykes, the acceptance of which is favored.
  • At Red Bank, N. J., eight surface wells have been sunk to supply the tanks of the New York and Long Branch Railroad. The entire flow from the artesian well is thus left for the use of the town.
  • The Canton (Dak.) Improvement Company has asked the city for an exclusive franchise for water-works, gas, electric lighting and telephone service. It offers to furnish the city with sixteen fire hydrants, at an annual rental of $800.
  • Bids for sluice-gates, stop-cocks, etc., were opened at Boston, Mass., by H. T. Rockwell, chairman water board, August 3, as follows. Z. E. Coffin, agent Coffin Valve Company, $10,717 ; Whittier Machine Company, $14,017 ; both of Boston. #
  • The water-works at Shreveport, La., constructed by S. R. Bullock & Co., of New York have been completed and tested. The works, which have cost nearly $250,000, include two pumping engines of 1,500,000 gallons capacity each ; two settling basins of 1,500,000 gallons capacity each ; a stand-pipe 25 by no feet, of 259,000 gallons capacity ; nine miles of mains and 106 double-nozzle hydrants. The water is taken from Cross bayou.

GAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING.

  • Francesville, Ind., has natural gas.
  • Gas works are talked of at Martinez, Col.
  • Gas mains will be laid in Spencerville, O.
  • Natural gas has been struck at Mexico, Mo.
  • A gas well will be sunk at Griffin, Ga., address Mrs. W. II. Lyon.
  • Fenton, Mich., contemplates the erection of an electric light plant.
  • A company is forming at Sioux City, la., to prospect for natural gas.
  • An incandescent electric light plant is being erected at Corsicana, Tex.
  • An electric light plant will be erected at Pensacola, Fla., by B. R. Pitt.
  • —Gas was adopted in Boston, Mass., as a means of illumination in 1822.
  • Hoosick Falls, N. Y., is contemplating the introduction of electric lights.
  • There are five gas wells at Kokomo, Ind., and three more are being drilled.
  • The Dublin (Ind.) Natural Gas Company asks for bids for sinking a gas well.
  • A. F. Lindermann, Whitehall, Mich., wants bids for sinking a gas well 1000 feet.
  • The Cherokee (Kan.) electric light franchise has been granted to Chas. M. Lucas.
  • Address Harris, Schabber & Monnett, concerning the sinking of a gas well at Bucyrus, O.
  • Tne Carey (O.) Natural Gas Company has increased its capital stock from $20,000 to $50,000.
  • Gas has been struck at Northampton, O.; arrangements are being made to pipe it to Springfield.
  • The Pueblo (Col.) Oil.and Gas Company will lay natural gas mains through the streets of that city.
  • Youngstown, O., wants bids for heating the schools with natural gas. Address the Board of Education.
  • The Union Electric Light Company has been granted a contract for lighting New Lexington, O., for five years.
  • The Norfolk and Virginia Beach Improvement Company will construct an electric light plant.
  • George S. Towen of Elgin, Ill., is preparing plans for lighting Dundee and Carpenterville with electricity.
  • The Bennington (N. Y.) Electric Light and Power Company will light that city for five years at $1600 per year.
  • The Oil Well Supply Company, Oil City, Pa., has received a large order for drilling supplies from the Island of Java.
  • Elias Duncan, L. Gregg and others have organized a company at Fayetteville, Ark., to prospect for gas and oil.
  • The Pittsburg (Pa.) Electric Cable Company has contracted to supply Denver, Col., with $400,000 worth of underground wires.
  • The United States Electric Light Company will put in 250 incandescent lights for the Natchez (Miss.) Cotton Mills Company.
  • The Richmond (Me.) Electric Light Company has applied for a charter, and will probably establish a plant in that town.
  • There are seven large gas wells in the vicinity of Wapakoneta, O. The last one struck produces 7,000,000 cubic feet per day.
  • Canastota, N. Y., voted yesterday on an appiopriation of $2000 for permanently lighting the streets with electricity. Result not yet known.
  • Red Bank, N. J., is debating the question of electric lighting. The American Electric Light Company of New York has made a proposition.
  • Anniston, Ala., has contracted with T. G. Foster & Co. of Montgomery for the erection of gas works and the laying of five mdes of pipe.
  • II. B. Allen and others of Hubbard City, Tex., have organized an oil and mining company for the purpose of developing oil in Nacogdoches county.
  • The Winnipesaukee Gas and Electric Light Company of New Hampshire proposes to lay pipes and extend electric light wires from Laconia to Lake Village.
  • The Brush-Swan Electric Light Company of Norfolk, Va., has been awarded the contract for lighting that city, including the city buildings, at $14,706 per annum.
  • Two natural gas companies completed last week the laying of their mains from the gas wells to Toledo, O., and the city was, on July 27, illuminated by natural gas for the first time.
  • At Bowling Green, O., Jess Carothers recently drilled tSo feet in the Porter well with gas instead of steam. Gas was introduced into the boiler at 100 pounds pressure, and operated on the machinery just the
  • same as steam. “ It was a novel sight,” says a local paper, “ to sec the machinery all in usual motion, and not a bit of steam or fire in sight.”
  • A. M. Pennock will erect a small electric light plant at Chattanooga, Tenn. If results prove satisfactory a company will be organized with a capital stock of about $200,000 to operate plants in Tennessee.
  • Julian F. Denison of New Haven, Conn., has invented an apparatus whereby burnt out carbons are automatically replaced as fast as need be. By his design an electric light will burn steadily for ninety hours or more without the need of any attention.
  • NEW Companies.—The Scott Avenue Deep Gas Well Company, Fort Scott, Kan., capital $5000; C. F. Drake, I). B. Berger and others… .The Hauss Electric Light Company, Chattanooga, Tenn., capital $100,000 ; D. J. Hauss, T. M. Dillie and others… .The Consumers’ Coal and Power Co. of Illinois, to operate coal mines, elect!ic power machinery, coke works, gas mains and right of way for lines and mains for the transmission of electricity and gas; capital $1,000,000 ; Wm. R. Morrison, Wm. Freudnan and others… .The Overhead Conductor Electric Railway Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., to purchase and sell patent rights for electric railway purposes; capital $500,000… .The Presque Isle Natural Gas Company, Erie, Pa., capital $11,500… .The Palestine (Tex.) Mining and Petroleum Company… .The Enterprise Natural Gas Company, Lindsburg, Kan.

OTHER MUNICIPAL WORKS.

  • Four culverts will be constructed at Piqua, O.
  • New sewers will be constructed at Cleveland, O.
  • Van Wert, O., wants plans for a sewerage system.
  • Brainerd, Minn., will construct 6000 feet of sewers.
  • Chattanooga, Tenn., will expend $50,000 for sewers.
  • Brick and pipe sewers will be laid at Milwaukee, Wis.
  • The sewerage question is being agitated at Aberdeen, Dak,
  • The sewerage question is being discussed at Santa Cruz, Col.
  • Saginaw, Mich., will expend $55,000 on sewerage improvements.
  • Bloomfield, Fla., will erect a court-house. Address I. S. Mahoney.
  • Survey’s are being made at Muskegon, Mich., for a sewerage system.
  • Minneapolis, Minn., and Michigan City, Ind., are constructing sewers.
  • Health Officer Butlner of Orange, N. J., proposes a $250,000 system of sewerage.
  • A city halt will he erected at Halstead, Kan. The city clerk may give information.
  • Owensboro, Ky., wants to ascertain the cost of extending the Mulberry street sewer.
  • Canton, N. Y., has voted against bonding the village for $35,000 for a sewerage system.
  • Fort Scott, Kan., wants bids for constructing two sewer districts. Address the Mayor,
  • Alpena, Mich., will vote upon the question of issuing $35,000 bonds for street improvements.
  • George A. Ellis of Durham, N, C., will construct a system of sewerage at Montgomery, Ala.
  • The proposed main sewer on Main street, Willirnaritic, Conn., will be built at a cost of $22,000.
  • A brick city hall will be built at Union Springs, Ala. Address J. D. Norman until August 15.
  • Montgomery, Ala., will construct a sewerage system after plans by George A. Ellis of Durham, N. C.
  • At Milwaukee, Wis., the Mrnomonee sewerage system will be connected with the South Menomonee canal.
  • The contract for deepening the harbor at Galveston, Tex., has been awarded to Fagin & Burke of Mobile, Ala.
  • Newport, R. I., wi.I vote on the question of issuing bonds for $33 000 for sewerage and other improvements on Tnames street.
  • —A. M. Smith, J. Van Lindley and others have formed a stock company and erected a sewer-pipe factory at Pornono, N. C.
  • The contract for railing on the Connecticut river bridge at Northamp ton, Mass., has been awarded to the Wrought-1 ron Bridge Company of Canton, O., at $4115.
  • Civil Engineer S. C. Heald has prepared plans for a system of sewerage at South Framingham, Mass. He favors the irrigation system, and estimates the cost at $140,000.
  • Bids for the construction of a system of pipe sewers for the village of Clyde, were opened at Albany, N. Y., by James Shanahan, superintend-
  • ent public works, August 3, as follows: James Robinson, Rochester, N. Y., $1296.30; Matthew Dillon, Syracuse, N. Y., $1665.80.
  • The bill to allow the construction of a tunnel under the English Channel has been defeated in the House of Commons by a vote of 153 to 107.
  • Ashland, Wia., Marquette, Negaunee and Ishpeming, Mich., and Sycamore, III., will construct sewers after plans of Chester B. Davis, C. E., of Chicago.
  • Montreal, Can., has annulled the contracts for sewers recently awarded, and thinks of advertising for new bids. The bids exceeded the appropriations.
  • The Pauly Jail Building Manufacturing Company of St. Louis, Mo., has been awarded the contract for steel cells for the Washington county (Md.) jail at $7000.
  • Green Island, N. Y., will issue bonds for $17,500 as a first installment for the construction of the new sewerage system. The total cost will be about $50,000.
  • Colonel P. A. Gilmore, United States Engineers, in his annual report asks for an appropriation of $750,000 for improving the harbor of Charleston, S. C., and $780,000 for that of Savannah, Ga.
  • The contract for constructing the Ilertel avenue sewer at Buffalo, N. Y., has been awarded to D. W. McConnell and Peter Hickler. The contract price is $229,978.89, and the work is to be completed within two years,
  • Bids for dredging in the Calumet river, between the Forks and onehalf mile east of Hammond, Ind., were opened at Chicago, Ill., by Major Thomas H. Handbury, corps of engineers, U. S. A., July 29, as follows : Samuel O. Dixon, Racine, Wis., 11 cents per cubic yard ; F. R. Crane, Chicago, III , 23 ; Dodge & Petrie, Chicago, Ill., 23 Robert Finch, Grand Haven, Mich., 25; Green’s Dredging Company, Chicago, Ill., 35.
  • Bids for the construction of brick and cement pipe sewers, manholes, etc., were opened at West Springfield, Mass., by E. S. Flower, July 30, as follows: Sackott Bros., $10,850; J. R. Driscoll, $11,400; both of Springfield; Straw & Whittlesey, Providence, R. I., $13,198; McCabe & Healey, $13,374; Patrick Heston, $14,575 ; both of Springfield. Sackett Bros, were awarded the contract. Stockwell Bettes, civil engineer, sends this information.
  • Lieutenant-Colonel I). C. Houston, in his annual report upon the improvement of the Connecticut river, asks for an appropriation of $250,000 to be expended next year, below Hartford ; also $100,000 for the Thames river, $7000 for Clinton harbor, $3,000 for New Haven ; for breakwater at New Haven, $500,000; Milford harbor, $6000 ; Housatonic river, $100,000; Bridgeport, $17,000 ; Black Rock harbor, $20,000 ; Norwalk harbor, $7000; Stamford harbor, $10,000; Port Cnester, $69,632 ;
  • Echo harbor, N. Y., $17,000; Mamaroneck harbor, N. Y., $28,000; Greenport harbor, N. Y., $21,000; Flushing bay, N. Y., $35,000; East Chester creek, N. Y., $30,000.
  • Bids for the iron, marble and slate work of stairways for the post office building, etc., at Baltimore, Md., were opened by the supervising architect, Washington, D. C., August r, as follows: Haugh, Ketcham & Co., $44,950; Winslow Bros., $49,500 ; same (no check), $51,200 ; Poulson & Eager, $58,901. Haugh, Ketcham & Co. were awarded the contract.
  • It has been decided that J. E. Simpson & Co. of New York shall build the new timber dry-docks at the Brooklyn and Norfolk navy yards, provided for by the last naval appropriation bill. The amount of the contract is $1,061,000. The contractors have agreed that the docks shall be 500 feet long instead of 480 feet, as was indicated in their proposals. They also have agreed that the government shall have the benefit of the things found in making the excavations for the docks.
  • Bids for iron work for fence, gates and stairs for the west wing of the building of the State, war and navy departments, were opened at Washington, D. C., by Col. L. Casey, U. S. A., August 3, as follows: Champion Iron Fence Company, Kenton, O., $1112 ; Manly & Cooper Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, Pa., $1336; Beckhorn & Middleton, $L5 ! Chas. White & Co., $1748 ; Geo. White & Sons, $1820 ; all of Washington ; Poulson & Eger, Brooklyn, N. Y., $3650.
  • John F. Kerns of Buffalo, N. Y., has applied fora patent for a motor by which he would utilize the power of the Niagara river. A pair of endlesschains, with cup attachments, working on pulley wheels, are so set as to form a right-angled triangle, the hypotehnuse of which extends into the river. It is expected that the water would exert an equal force on each cup. A guard pen would be built above the motor to turn the curren against the chain. Mr. Kern believes that $10,000 will pay for the motor.
  • Bids for the construction of sewers and appurtenances at Clifton, were opened at Cincinnati, O., by A. S. Hobby, July 29, as follows : For sewers, J. M. Peter, $36,421.50; Thos. J. Peter, $39,905.80; Charles M. Steele, $40,961 ; Barton & Joute, $41,553 40 ; fof cast-iron manhole covers, Francis Fritsch, 2% cents per pound; L. Jones & Sons, 2% cents; Eureka Foundry, 2% cents; Kreiger, Burkhardt & Co., 2% cents ; HoeffinghoffSi Lane, $2.25 per 100 pounds; Victor Knecht, $2.65 ; all of Cincinnati.
  • Bids for brick and vitrified pipe sewer were opened at Norwalk, Conn., by Asa Smith, chairman sewer committee, July 25, as follows: John S. Bogert & Son, $33,931.94; Francis Leonard, $38,979; both of Brooklyn, N. Y. George W. Crane, Norwalk, Conn., $40,274.36; Raymond Bros., South Norwalk, Conn., $45,658.40; A. Brazoo & Sons, Middlefield, Conn., $49,002.05. The contract was awarded to John S. Bogert Si Sons. The borough clerk, John S. Seymour, kindly furnishes this information.

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