Water Supply for New York.

Water Supply for New York.

Mayor McClellan, in his annual message to the city council of New York, adverts to the subject of the municipal water supply. He practically recommends the abolition of the aqueduct commission, recommends filtration of the Croton water supply and reports progress on the work that is being done on the Catskill water system, as follows:

“At my request the secretary of the aqueduct lommission has furnished me with a statement of the running expenses of the commission during the year 1906. which is approximately the same, if not a trifle lower, than the running expenses for 1907. The chief engineer has furnished me with a report showing the percentage of work on the Jerome Park reservoir, the Cross River reservoir and the Croton Falls reservoir. the only work the commission now has under way. 1 have also been furnished with a statement of the percentage of time expired on these contracts. The Cross River reservoir is practically completed, ninety-six per cent, of the work being done in November, 1907. The contract time expired in September, 1907. The contract time on the Jerome Park reservoir expired long ago. and but fifty per cent, of the work has been done. This is due in a measure to the suspension of work pending the decision of the city to use the easterly basin for a filtration plant. Forty-four per cent, of the contract time on the Croton Falls reservoir has expired, and but seventeen per cent, of the work has been completed. The running expenses of the aqueduct commission during 1906 were $308,290.93, of which $274,531.92 was for salaries. The expense of this commission is so vastly out of proportion to the work it has on hand that its abolition at any time would seem to me advisable. The great works the commission undertook are. with the exception of one reservoir. practically completed, and the time has come, in my opinion, to merge their functions with those of the commissioner of water supply. gas and electricity the latter to take into his department such of the engineers of the commission as are necessary for the proper completion of the work under way. * * * During the year maps for the acquisition of some 11,637 acres of land have been prepared and approved by the board of water supply and by the board of estimate and apportionment. These maps are separated into twenty-two sections and include 1,314 parcels of land. Fleven sections show land to be acquired for the Ashokan reservoir, including dams and the reservoir basin. Three sections indicate land to be acquired for the aqueduct from the Ashokan reservoir at Olive bridge to the Orange county line. Six sections are for land for the Kensico reservoir, including the dam at Valhalla, and two sections for the Hill View reservoir at Yonkers. The work on the aqueduct line between Cold Spring and Hunters brook, which has been proceeding under contract let on March 27. 1907, has progressed favorably. A large amount of work has been done in preparing designs, contract drawings and specifications for the various contracts let and to be let. It is estimated that about $20,000,000 worth of work is practically ready for contract. This includes the Rondout and Walkill syphons and the dam at Kensico. * * * Plans are ready for the filtration of the Croton water supply. Sanitary and engineering authorities are agreed that filtration is an ultimate necessity. By making use of the cast basin of the Jerome Park reservoir the cost of a plant to purify the 400.000,000 gal. a day can be kept to $8,500,000. The cost of operation is estimated at $2.50 per 1.000.000 gal. As soon as the city can prudently assume the financing of this project, I believe it should be done. In spite of constant vigi lance, the protection of a watershed of 360 sq. miles is annually becoming more difficult, expensive and uncertain. The only real safety lies in filtration.”

North Carolina Power Plant Dam Nearing Completion.

WATER SUPPLY FOR NEW YORK.

WATER SUPPLY FOR NEW YORK.

On the subject of the water supply for New York city the New York Tribune says editorially: “We have hitherto expressed, and are now all the more confirmed in the belief that the city ought to secure all the water from Dutchess county that is not needed up there for local consumption. It ought to do the same in Suffolk county, and, also, in the Catskill region. When it has done so, it will have a daily supply the year round of. at least, 1,300,000,000. and. perhaps, of 1,500,000,000, gallons, which, w ith reasonable precautions against waste, will lie enough for a community of 12,000. 000 inhabitants, or three times the present size of New York. There may be reason for doubting that New York will ever grow beyond such size If it does not, then these sources of supply will be sufficient for its uses for all time. At any rate, we do not think it incumbent upon the present generation to incur expenses and responsibilities and to make plans for any greater expansion of the metropolis than that to 12,000,000, while to object to the utilisation of a most convenient and. in all respects, acceptable water supply as insufficient, because it would not be enough for a larger community than that, seems to us extravagant and visionary. The duty of the time is. rather, to proceed with all possible expedition to the making of these supplies available for the city’s use. And that work should be done with the double view, first, of making a large addition to the city’s supply at the earliest possible moment. and, second, of utilising in time the entire supplies from all these sources according to a harmonious and economical general plan.”

There will lie no leniency upon the part of the Chicago water department towards those who are delinquent in paying their water taxes, and have obstructed the shut-off boxes, with the object of preventing a discontinuance of their supply. Superintendent Nourse has issued an order that, as soon as the frost is out of the ground, access must be obtained to the shut-off boxes, even if it becomes necessary to break the cement sidewalks to do so.