Water Supply of Kearny

Water Supply of Kearny

William B. Ross, town clerk of Kearny, N. J., is gathering data regarding the water supply for the town after the expiration of the present contract with the Suburban Water Company, next year. Councilman J. Albert Booth of Kearny has made the following statement in connection with the water situation: “The price paid under the present contract is $82.50 a million gallons. The present daily average consumption is nearly five million gallons. It is estimated that in the next fifteen years the consumption will be ten million gallons daily in Kearny. Therefore, an average consumption of seven and a half million gallons a day during a period of fifteen years, the term of the present contract, would mean, at the present price, an expenditure of: Seven and a half million gallons a day at $82.50, for fifteen years, $3,387,645. This means that the town will expend for the purchase of water during the next fifteen years over three million dollars. This is a large amount of money, and the greatest precautions should be taken to protect the taxpayers and to see they get the greatest benefits for the sum expended. This water is diverted from the Passaic at Little Falls by the East Jersey Water Company and delivered by them to the Xew York and New Jersey Water Company and the New Jersey Suburban Water Company, at the intersection of Kearny avenue and the Bellevifle turnpike, in the town of Kearny. These same companies supply water to Bloomfield from precisely the same source for the sum of $65 a million gallons and also sell to private concerns in adjacent municipalities at the same or even a lower rate. If these companies can thus afford to sell the same water that they are now supplying us to other municipalities and private concerns, there is no reason whatever why the town should not purchase its water at the same price as anyone else. A study of the water situation reveals an amazing state of affairs. The New York and New Jersey Water Company and the New Jersey Suburban .Water Company, who now supply the town with water, own no plant; they do not even possess the commodity which they .sell. They are merely middlemen, for whose existence there is absolutely no excuse. There is no reason whatever why the town can not obtain its supply of water from original sources at a greatly reduced rate, and I am convinced that during the life of the present water contract the town has lost a great deal of money because it has been held up by these companies.” Many citizens favor construction of a municipally owned system.

No posts to display