WATER SUPPLY OF MARSHALL.

WATER SUPPLY OF MARSHALL.

In 1885 when Marshall, Mo., was a small town of about 3,000 inhabitants, the Marshall Water company, under a twenty-year franchise which fixed rates and provided that the city might purchase (as it has purchased) the waterworks system, built the plant, with a thirty-six-foot well as the source of supply, from which the water was pumped direct. There were then only five miles of mains, with only too taps in service and sixty-seven fire hydrants set. The consumption was 200,000, the domestic pressure was eighty pounds; the fire, 130 pounds. The whole cost of the system was $75,000. In 1888, while the population had increased, the mileage of mains remained the same; the number of taps had twenty added to it; and the consumption was increased by 25,000 gallons. Today, to supply a population of over 6,000, it has added to the wells; has a reservoir capacity of 60,000 gallons, six miles of main, ten-inch to four-inch, laid, eighty-nine Ludlow hydrants and 12 valves set, twenty meters, Nash and Buffalo, installed, and 250 galvanised iron services connected to the mains. Its domestic pressure is now seventy pounds; fire pressure, 120 to 130 pounds, and its average daily consumption is 275,000 gallons; its average per capita consumption, fifty-five gallons. There are installed two compound Worthington pumping engines, with a capacity of 2,000,000 gallons. The cost of the system up to date has been $100,000. The city now owns the works. The manager and superintendent is J. E. McAnnis; the engineer. J. A. Peck. The system is well and economically managed.

SUPT. J. E. M’ANNIS, MARSHALL,MO.PUMPING STATION, MARSHALL, MO.

A proposed amendment to the charter of San Francisco, Cal., if carried, will take away from the fire commissioners of that city the right of awarding as they please the contracts for the department.

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