WATER SUPPLY OF ST. LOUIS.

WATER SUPPLY OF ST. LOUIS.

It seems probable that, notwithstanding the large expenditure upon the Chain of the Rocks construction, St. Louis must look for some other source of supply. The two plans proposed are filtration of the Mississippi or Missouri water, or a steel conduit line from Meramac spring, ninety mills distant from the city. It was thought possible to complete either of these plans before the opening of the World’s fair; but, as Edward Flad. the water commissioner, states, it will not be feasible to carry one or the other of them out in time for that event. The engineers appointed by the mavor to consider plans for a new supply have stated that it would take two vears after the passage of the city ordinance authorising the work to complete either of the schemes proposed.

The Proctor stock company is presenting many celebrated plays, along with revivals of old comedies. The olays of the late Chas. H. Hoyt are now in hand and the full repertoire will be presented Clay M Greene has been secured to write travesties on current dramatic successes, and will devote himself exclusively to the service of Manager Proctor for the remainder of the season. A special branch of the Proctor stock will present these travesties, and the innovation will be made a feature in the Proctor entertainments.

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WATER SUPPLY OF ST. LOUIS.

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WATER SUPPLY OF ST. LOUIS.

A dispatch from St. Louis, Mo., dated May 25, states that the first step towards the water purification of the city taken by the new municipal administration came in the form of a message from Mayor Wells, addressed to both houses of the assembly at their meetings on Friday, the 24th inst. “ The mayor sent with his message the draft of an ordinance authorizing the appointment of three hydraulic engineers. These, t he mayor states, are to be the best men obtainable in the United States, and it will be their duty to investigate local conditions and recommend a system for providing the city with a pure water supply. The expenses of the investigation and the salaries of the members of the commission are to be provided from a .fund of $25,000 taken from waterworks revenue. Several attempts were made by the board of public improvements under the last city administration to secure the passage by the assembly of a measure appropriating money for experiments in filtration. These ordinances were invariably defeated in the assembly. No filtration measures have been brought before the board during the present administration, and the only matters relating to the water supply which the board has thus far received have been t he renewed Meramac springs proposal and the report of Water Commisi-ioner Flad, recommending filtration. If Mayor Wells’s plan is adopted, the board will have much less to do with the initial steps of water purification measures than it would have had if the ordinances had beeu passed by the last assembly. The mayor’s message on the subject follows: ‘The question of supplying the city with pure water is of the utmost importance, and one in which I believe all citizens are deeply interested. To accomplish this will entail the expenditure of several million dollars. Inasmuch as the matter is now before the board of public improvements for its consideration and action, in my opinion, before proceeding farther, we should have the advice of the very best hydraulic engineers that tills country can produce. A mistake would cost the city many millions of dollars. I suggest that the power be granted for the appointment of a commission of three expert hydraulic engineers, whose duties shall he to examine carefully the present water plant of the city and to investigate thoroughly and submit a report of estimation and recommendation as to the most feasible manner of providing the city with an adequate supply of clear and wholesome water. I inclose herewith a copy of what I deem to be a bill appropriate to carry out my recommendation.’”