WATER SYSTEM OF ROCK ISLAND.

WATER SYSTEM OF ROCK ISLAND.

During the year ending April, 1902, Superintendent Bancroft pumped 1,297.379,930 gallons—an average of 3,554,465 gallons per day for the entire city, or a rate of 161.56 gallons per capita. The pump ran 6,910 hours; the amount of coal used was 3,545 tons; and the cost of the fuel was $4,844.76. It is believed with good reason that fully one-half of the water pumped to the consumers of the city is wasted, and it is recommended that this must stop or another pump must be purchased to provide against emergencies. The setting of as many meters as possible each year till every tap in the city is supplied with one is advised as the most economical and reliable method of meeting the difficulty. It is also urged that the meter system be extended to the city schools, and that they be requested to pay rates the same as other consumers. The reservoir is in good condition; on being tested in actual use, the pressure was 130 pounds. The extent of the bluff service was doubled during the year. The amount of water pumped was 85,323,840 gallons. A fourth filter is necessary, as the present system is inadequate. It should be constructed in accordance with the original plans, thus giving a capacity equal to the present rate of consumption. At the present time, it is stated, the suspended matter is taken out of the water, but it is not rendered free from bacteria as it would be if proper time were allowed in its passage through the sand. The sand in the filter has been reduced to half its original depth through the cleaning process, and the advisability of replacing it and also of installing a washing machine with which to treat it is discussed. The amount of six-inch water mains laid during the year was 1,600 feet and of four-inch pipe, 1.370 feet. The recommendation is made that a twelve-inch main be laid connecting with the Twenty-second street main at Ninth avenue, extending west to make connections with all lateral mains. Twenty-three meters were set during the year, making a total of eightyseven in the city. It may be added that the rates at Rock Island are lower than in any other city known where water is filtered, and lower than in many cities where no filter is used. In order to meet the incurred indebtedness with the interest, to make further improvements and pay the increased cost of operating, a raise in the rates is favored.

The permanent stock companies at Proctor’s Albany and Montreal have won immediate favor. The best metropolitan successes are being presented with a change of bill weekly, and the selected companies give fine performances. There is just enough vaudeville interlarded between acts to lend diversity and maintain the performances continuous.

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