Water Tanks in German Samoa

Water Tanks in German Samoa

Having no water works in German Samoa, all but the native residents derive their supply from the rain on the roofs carried into tanks beside their houses. The natives use the near-by streams from the mountain side for bathing and laundry work and carry the water in cocoanut shells to their huts for drinking purposes. Of the three styles of water tanks the round corrugated galvanized iron are in most common use. The metal is brought from Sydney or Auckland and made up locally, a 600-gallon tank selling for $30. Yearly about 60 square boiler-iron tanks are imported entire from England and generally filled with tinned herrings, draperies or other goods to save freight and insure safety in transit. A similar size of this variety, not corrugated, is of same value as the corrugated round tank but will give longer wear. There are also in use a number of California redwood tanks, built in San Francisco, taken apart for shipment and reassembled in Apia. They are cheaper than the iron tanks and, if care is given them, will last as long. Another advantage in their favor is that the salt air at the coast has less effect on wood than on iron. —Consul Mason Mitchell, Apia.

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