Water Tanks on Trucks Provide Emergency Supply

Water Tanks on Trucks Provide Emergency Supply

Novel Plan Adopted When Lake Dried Up Through Drought in Abilene, Texas—Block Fire in the Business District of August, Ga., Does Great Damage—Burnings of the Week

Automobile Water Tanks as Fire Extinguishers

The following letter from the manager of the Texas Inspection Bureau tells of a novel arrangement for fire protection :

To the Editor :

You may be sufficiently interested in the enclosed kodak pictures to print them, as we believe this is the first time that such means have been used to provide some degree of fire protection when the regular distribution system is not available. The city of Abilene, Texas, has depended on an artificial lake as a source of water supply which in times of continued drouth has proven inadequate to the demands of service. Their new supply, located some 18 miles southwest of the city, was not yet available at the time the old lake supply was exhausted, and the arrangement as pictured was provided, consisting of two army trucks on which were mounted two corrugated iron tanks, each of 525 gallons capacity. Roth tanks were connected to a common discharge line provided with a quick opening valve and the hard 2 1/2-inch suction for the auto pumping engines attached. Both trucks respond to all alarms and several small fires have been stopped in the mercantile section, and we are enclosing a picture of what was accomplished in the residence section. The house thus shown was located some 2,000 feet from the nearest fire hydrant and no doubt would have been a total loss even under ordinary conditions, if the “submarines” (the “water wagons” have thus been nicknamed), had not been available.

An Example of What the Tank Truck Can Do: The Building Was Well Involved When the Truck Arrived. But with Its Aid the Fire Was Stopped.The Tank Truck, Carrying Two Tanks of 525 Gallons Each.Rear view of Truck, Showing Cross-Connection of Tanks

One of the oldest fire chiefs in Texas in point of service is Captain J. J. Clinton, in charge of the Abilene fire department, but he gives full credit for the inception of the idea to one of his firemen, Frank Farrier. The city officials have been so pleased with the work done with these trucks that they intend keeping one of them in service for use in residence sections remote from fire protection.

Trusting that this may prove of interest to the various

fire departments to which your magazine goes, and with best

wishes, we are,

S. W. INGUSH. Manager,

Yours very truly,

Dallas, Tex., Feb. 27, 1022. Texas Inspection Bureau.

Editor’s Vote: Just what can be expected from such an arrangement may be determined from the following figures:

Total capacity of two tanks — 1,050 gallons. This quantity of water will supply a

1 -inch nozzle at 20 pounds for 8 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 25 pounds for 7 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 30 pounds for 6 1/2 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 35 pounds for 6 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 40 pounds for 5 1/2 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 45 pounds for 5 1/4 minutes

1 -inch nozzle at 50 pounds for 5 minutes

l 1/8-inch nozzle at 25 pounds for 5 1/2 minutes

1 1/8-inch nozzle at 30 pounds for 5 minutes

1 1/8-inch nozzle at 35 pounds for 4 3/4 minutes

1 1/8-inch nozzle at 40 pounds for 4 1/2 minutes

l 1/8-inch nozzle at 45 pounds for 4 1/4 minutes

1 1/8-mch nozzle at 50 pounds for 4 minutes

1 1/4-inch nozzle at 30 pounds for 4 1/4 minutes

1 1/4-inch nozzle at 35 pounds for 3 3/4 minutes

1 1/4-inch nozzle at 40 pounds for 3 1/2 minutes

1 1/4-mch nozzle at 45 pounds for 3 1/4 minutes

1 1/4-inch nozzle at 50 pounds for 3 1/4 minutes

This apparatus should prove effective on small dwelling fires, or on fires that have not gained much headway. They arc excellent for the purpose intended and are a first class second line of defense when the fire gets away from chemicals.

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