WATER TROUBLES IN CHICAGO.

WATER TROUBLES IN CHICAGO.

Like New York, Chicago is having her share of trouble (by no means for the first time) with some of its water takers. It appears that several private concerns, whose career on present conditions the mayor is determined to bring to an end, have connections by individual tunnels with both the city tunnels and the river, leading to breweries and factories. Among these are the following (probably there are others): The tunnel of the Metropolitan elevated railroad, constructed at a cost of $100,000 and extending 6,000 feet from the river to the power station at Center avenue, was built in 1895. So far as the records examined disclose, the work was done on a permit issued by William D. Kent, who was then commissioner of public works. Although it is estimated that the saving to the company in obtaining its water in this way will be $53,562 during the term of the company’s ordinance, no compensation is paid the city. The tunnel passes beneath several city streets and alleys. T he water, if secured from the city, would cost the company about $10,000 a year. Mayor Dunne has declared that he will order the tunnel to be closed, if he finds that an ordinance for its construction was not passed by the council at that time, lie has asked the corporation counsel for an opinion on the right of the company to lay the tunnel under the elevated structure. In the case of several breweries, it was found that they were pumping direct from the city tunnels and paying at the rate of two and two and a half cents per 1,000 gallons. The Deering and McCormick plants of the International Harvester company, it was found, are also connected by private tunnels with the river. T he Northwestern Flevated Railroad company has a main from the Fullerton avenue tunnel under a permit of May 21, 1896. It paid $20,000 for the first seven years and $3,000 a year compensation for an unlimited water supply. The South Side Elevated company has a main from the Thirty-ninth street sewer under a contract with the sanitary district, by which it pays $1 a year for every horsepower developed at the power plant. Booth & Co. pays $300 a year for a sixteen-inch and twelve-inch main across North Water street to the river under an ordinance of December 17, 1900. The Glucose company pumps water from the city tunnel under a ten-year franchise from February 3, 1902, for $25 per 1.000,000 gallons. The Atlas Brewing company pumps water from a tunnel under an ordinance of February 17, 1902, for $25 per 1,000,000 gallons. The Fortune Brewery company pays $20 per 1,000,000 gallons under a revocable ordinance to pump water from a city tunnel. The Chicago Coated Board company runs a sixteen-inch main from 549 North River street to the river for $300 a year under a tenyear grant beginning October 28, 1901. The Bartholomae & Roessing brewery secured water since 1883 from the Polk street tunnel for $20 per 1,000,000 gallons. Assistant City Engineer Shaw already has directed the comptroler to refuse to accept payment from the Deering Harvester plant. The company has been pumping water through a thirty-inch main from the Fullerton avenue water tunnel and has been paying at the rate of $250 a year. This is regarded as so inadequate that steps have been taken to force an adjustment of the price.

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