WATER WASTE AND WATER SUPPLY.

WATER WASTE AND WATER SUPPLY.

COL. WARING, head of this city’s street cleaning department has shown from ample English experiences that

the difficulty with the Brooklyn water supply is not insufficiency. I also demonstrated the fact (he adds) that, with the suppression of underground waste, without paying much attention to waste in the houses, the present supply of this city, leaving the Brooklyn supply out of consideration, is amply sufficient for a population of ten million.

Col. Waring might have gone farther and satis, factorily shown that a similar underground wastage exists in this, and in other cities. The Deacon test for detecting leakage and preventing that and other sources of water waste was applied over twenty years ago in Liverpool, and effected an immense saving in that city. In New York the daily consumption of water averages about 225,000,000 gallons—over 1 to gallons per capita—daily. In Boston, in 1883, it was clearly proved by actual tests, that of the ninety-five gallons per head daily consumed at least fifty per cent, was wasted. In all American cities,’as was shown some years ago by the annual report of Lieut.-Col. Ludlow, chief engineer of the Philadelphia water department, where tests have been made, the estimates of waste are from fifty per cent, to seventy-five per cent, of the whole supply. In New York probably only forty gallons of water out of the i io gallons per capita daily consumption are actually used by the consumer—the rest being waste; whence we may fairly reckon that this city’s existing sources of supply are sufficient for a population of six million. Yet the cry is for additional sources of water supply, instead of for the adoption of a system of stopping the leaks, and of the compulsory use of meters. In England, even allowing that there is greater economy in the use of water than in America—bathrooms not being as yet looked upon as necessary adjunctsto every house, and flats being comparatively unknown—the conclusions of engineers tend to prove that a daily supply of thirtyfive gallonsper head is sufficient for all purposes, domestic, sanitary, industrial, and protective. These engineers grounded this estimate on the theory (which, after all, was too well proved by investigation to be looked upon as a theory) that two-thirds of the water supplied to the cities and towns to which the*test was applied never entered the buildings at all, but ran off into the ground and was wasted. By the application of the Deacon test in Liverpool, the leakage was detected and minimized and by this policy of stopping the leaks the cost of supplying the water to the consumers was considerably reduced. In Boston the Deacon meter service has been reett iblished, and the results of its work in the detection of leaks and waste have been satisfactory. Why should not at least that same meter service be established in this city and in Brooklyn ? Whyshould not the principle be carried farther and meterage be rendered compulsory in the case of every consumer ? Even then an allowance of much more water than is meted out to the English consumer might be allowed, and a great saving be still the result.

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