WATERWORKS DATA OF CLEVELAND AND TOLEDO

WATERWORKS DATA OF CLEVELAND AND TOLEDO

In 1872 the city of Toledo, Ohio, determined to unite all the waterworks system under the supervision of the late J. D. Cook, consulting engineer. The council authorised a bond issue of $997,000 for the purpose. In May, 1873, two 5,000,000-gal. duplex Worthington pumps were purchased, and in 1874 a pumping station was built; a standpipe was erected; and the mains were all laid—the whole work having been completed. The system is pumping direct to a tall iron standpipe 5 x 226, with a capacity of 30.000 gals. The average pumpage for a population of 140,000, more or less, is about 13,000,000 gals, daily—a percapita alowance of something over sixty gals, a low average due to the installation of about 0,000 meters on some 13,800 services, sixty per cent, of which are metered, including all large connections. The distributing mains extend over 220 miles of which some seventy-one are 30 in. The diameter of the mains ranges from that figure to 6-in. A 20-in. cast iron main was laid thirty feet below the average stage of the water in the Maumee river (the source of supply), for 1,600 ft. The water taken at a point two miles and one-half above the main part of the city. The pressure from the standpipe, when full, is at the station 103 pounds; the average head pumped against being 108 ft. A large well in a comparatively new pumping station includes the five pumping engines. These are as follows: Two vertical, high duty, Worthington compound, duplex condensing engines, with a capacity of 15,000,000 gals, each; two, Worthington compound of 5,000,000 gals, each; one Knowles compound, of 5.000,000 gals., the whole pumping capacity aggregating 45 -000.000 gals, per day. One thousand four hundred Bourbon, Wood, Smith. Vaile. and Michigan Bridge Iron Works hydrants are set; 1.J50 valves of the Michigan, Smith, Bourbon, Eddy and Ludlow makes; and considerably over 7.000 meters are installed of the Crown, Union, Empire, Mersey rotary and disk, Thomson. Ball & Fitts, Worthington. Niagara, Keystone, Trident and Nash typos, and all owned by the consumers. The services are pipe lead, The domestic pressure is 70 lbs.; tire, IOO lbs, A filtration svstem is now being considered, ?, M Wisler is superintendent of the system.

INTERIOR VIEW OF PUMPING STATION. TOLEDO, O.

THREE WATER SYSTEMS AT CLEVELAND.

Cleveland, Ohio, has practically three waterworks systems. One is a low-service, which is supplied from a reservoir, with an clevation of 170 ft. It supplies about two-thirds of the city. Another is a high-service district, whose supply comes from an elevation of 320 ft. and supplies the remaining third. The third system is that from a standpipe, now practically completed. It stands on an elevation of 570 ft. and furnishes water to New burg village, and Cleveland Heights village, suburban towns on the high elevation east of the city. A new feature is also under consideration in Cleveland namely, the highpressure lire system in the downtown district, which will be connected with the tireboats. Extra heavy cast iron pipe is being put in, with lead joints. These are being tested to a pressure of 450 lbs. The existing waterworks were contracted in 1854 under the supervision of C. E. Schulz, the source being lake Erie, at a point distant four miles from tiie farmer’s section of the city. The system is pumping to a reservoir of stone, cement and earth filling, built at an elevation of 170 ft. There is a second at an elevation of 320 ft. and the standpipe, 570 ft. hirh, already mentioned, the three supplying a low-service and two high services. The quality of the water is good and comes through conduit tunnels from distant points in this lake, the construction of which has been already described in these columns. The pumping machinery has been furnished by the Allis-Chalmcrs company, the Holly Mfg. company, Worthington, Knowles and Kilby. There are 650 miles of cast iron mains laid, varying from 48-in. to 3-in. in diameter. Seven thousand six hundred and forty-two hydrants arc set, the styles used being those of R. i). Wood & Co., the Michigan and others. Fourteen thousand two hundred and fifty-six valves of various makes are on the systems. The city owns the 44.167 meters—from ⅝-in. to 8-in.—that are installed, the ⅝-in. being of the Trident and Lambert type, the ¾-in. to 8-in. Mersey and Worthington. There are 65.766 j4-in. to i-in. lead serices in use; the domestic pressure is 20 lbs. to 125 lbs., varying on the three systems; the tire pressure is supplied by’ the fire engines. The total consumption for the year past was 22,053.421,992 gals.; per day (average) 60.420,334 gals.; per-capita daily 130.7. The cost of the construction of the works to date has been $3,953,020: bonded debt, $4,266,000 at four per cent.: annual cost of maintenance, $400,000. The superintendent is E. W. Bemis.

SUPT. EDWARD W. BEMIS, CLEVELAND, OHIO.PUMPING STATION, TOLEDO, O.
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