WATERWORKS OF MASSILLON

WATERWORKS OF MASSILLON

The Massillon Waterworks system was constructed in 1887 under a twenty-year franchise, and, as that term will expire in a little over two years, the city is naturally looking forward either to framing a new contract on more favorable terms, or the purchase of the works. Arbitrators will probably be called in to fix a fair price upon the plant. The system of the Massillon Water Supply company is composed of two pumping stations; one standpipe; twenty-seven and one half miles of water mains, from four to sixteen inches in diameter; two miles of smaller sizes and two miles of wood pipe on the lowpressure or gravity line making a total of thirtyone and one-half miles of pipe, and 295 double“ nozzle fire hydrants. The water supply is from seven artesian wells, which are drilled down 200 feet into the sand rock and furnish a supply, the purity of which has never been questioned, and the volume of which shows no signs of exhaustion. The main pumping station is a neat and Mibstantial brick building, situated about one mile from the centre of the city, and surrounded by a beautiful little park, in which arc a pond, wooded island, and other attractive features, which, during the summer time make a very pleasant spot. The pumping machinery consists of one compound, duplex, condensing engine of 2,000,000-gallon capacity, manufactured by the Blake Manufacturing company; another engine of the same type of 1,500,000-gallon capacity, built by the Deane Steam Pump company, of Holyoke, Mass.; one duplex, condensing engine of 1,000,ooo-gallon capacity, of the Worthington pattern; and one power pump of 750,000-gallon capacity, the latter operated by a fifty-horsepower Corliss engine. ‘The station is equipped with its own electric light plant, a lathe for general repair work, lire alarm bell and indicator, electric bell to en ginccr’s residence, and is, in fact, firstclass and upto-date in every respect. Coal is used as fuel; and is brought to the door by rail, thus avoiding the extra expense connected with hauling, t here is, also, an emergency station, situated on high ground connected to a 5Q,ooo,ooo-ga 1 Ion reservoir, and equipped with a Blake compound, duplex, pumping engine of 2,000,000-gallon capacity, which can be put into service in case of emergency, such as a flood, serious breakdown at the main pumping station or conflagration in the city. The standpipe, which, is also located on high ground, is twenty-five feet in diameter, 150 feet in height, and has a capacity for 550,000 gallons of water. There are 2,500 connections in use, with 275 meters set. During the year of 1904. 240,064,115 gallons of water were pumped—averaging 655,915 gallons per day, or an average of forty-six gallons per capita. The president of the company is Edmund LeB. Gardiner, of Paterson, N. J.; Whitney Conant. of the same city, is secretary and treasurer; and A. W. Inman, of Massillon, is superintendent. Superintendent Inman has had charge of the plant for thirteen years, during wnich time he has brought it to a high state of development. His business relations in Massillon are of the most pleasant, and his courteous manner of attending to all complaints and providing for repairs has made him many friends. The system is in good working order; all departments are run in a thorough businesslike manner; and much of the credit is deserved by the Massillon ⅛ iperintendent. Mr. Inman also holds the office of 6r*t v^president of The Central States Waterwqfcks -‘Association.

A. W. INMAN, Superintendent, Massillon, OhioINTERIOR PUMPING STATION, MASSILLON, OHIO.

Cohoes, N. Y.. has indefinitely postponed the date of receiving bids for the proposed new pumping engines.

No posts to display