Waterworks Report of Houston

Waterworks Report of Houston

The report of Commissioner Robert L. Jones, of the Houston, Tex., waterworks for the past year, certainly shows what has been done in that city in the extension and improvement of the system. He says:

“You will observe from the attached reports of the superintendent and chief engineer that the year just passed has been very progressive. Among the many improvements that will be noticeable we have laid 25,026 feet of 8-inch water pipe, placed 37 fire hydrants, set 3,718 water meters and a great many minor improvements mentioned in the report, which will tend to improve the general efficiency of the system. The water mains have greatly benefited many citizens of the city who have not had the advantage of same previously and also decrease the fire risks considerably, and this fact should be more Apparent when the board of underwriters rerate the state this year. The pressure on the mains has been maintained and the department has had no complaints from lack of same. The city has 889 fire hydrants in good woring order. These hydrants are inspected and blown once every month, they are oiled frequently and kept in order by an inspector, whose only duty is to look after them. The expenditure for the year shows a slight increase compared with the previous year. This is accounted for by the large increase in the business of the department, which has steadily increased during the year. The outstanding indebtedness has been greatly reduced, and the new business coming in every month has shown that the department is growing in popular favor. The total revenue for the year amounts to $251,612.04, and the total expense, improvements $77,825.31, and interest $51,220, and running expense $78,602.17, making a total expenditure of $210,647.48. The artesian wells, owned by the city of Houston, show very slight depreciation, the present available supply being very near the same as shown by our last report; and, with a decreased pumpage, caused principally by the large increase in meters preventing waste, and by the diligence of the employes of the department, conserving the supply of the water. The department is in a better condition to care for ordinary fires, sanitary and other contingencies that may arise than at any period since the city of Houston bought the plant, and the fire suction from Buffalo Bayou is always ready to be turned into the system immediately. The city has ample supply of water for all purposes for the incoming year. The repairs during the year have been very light and consist mainly in improving the grounds, reflooring the engine rooms and painting all the pumping machinery, which is now in first class order and in appearance looks as good as a new plant.”

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