WATERWORKS SYSTEM OF DU BOIS

WATERWORKS SYSTEM OF DU BOIS

The water system of DuBois, Pa., was constructed in 1890 by the DuBois Waterworks company. The source of supply was from springs located in the hills about seven miles northeast of the town, the water being piped to a storage basin one mile distant. This basin is formed by an earth embankment lined with vitrified brick, with concrete bottom; it has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons and is 200 feet above the town, which gave about eighty pounds pressure. In 1895 this supply became inadequate for the needs of the town. To increase it, a number of wells were drilled, from which the water was pumped direct into the city mains. It was found that this well water was so contaminated with salt, sulphur and other minerals that it was unfit for domestic use. Even with this additional supply the company failed to furnish a sufficient amount of water in dry seasons, which last from one to three months in this latitude. In 1897 the city purchased the plant from the company for $61,800. Soon after acquiring the works the borough council sought to procure an additional supply adequate for the present and the future needs of the town. G. W. Knight, C. E., of Rome, N. Y., was engaged to make a survey and report of the proposed new system. He considered Anderson creek—a stream situated about seven miles southeast of DuBois and on the other side of the borough dividing line—was the only available source for the future needs of the town. The plan of Mr. Knight involved the building of a dam or storage basin on the headwaters of Anderson creek and a tunnel 3,400 feet long to carry the water westerly through the divide; the purchasing of lands for a reservoir site and watershed; and securing the right of way for about seven miles of pipe line and tunnel. Anderson creek is one of the tributaries of the Allegheny river, 16,350 feet above tidewater at the point proposed for the dam. In the spring of 1901, bids were solicited for the construction of the dam and tunnel. The contract for the dam was awarded to the Coryell Construction company, of Williamsport, Pa., at $34,000, and the contract for driving the tunnel to the Shaffner Construction company, of Butler, Pa., for $24,000. In April, 1903, the council purchased the pipe, valves and special castings for the conduit, consisting of 17,220 feet of sixteen-inch and 18.350 feet of twenty-inch cast iron pipe, from the United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry company, of New York. The contract for laying the pipe was let to Mullen & Kuns, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa. The dam is formed by an earth embankment with a puddled trench running through the centre and carried below the bed of the creek and well into the banks on the other side of the dam. The flow-side of the embankment is lined with stone rip-rap. and the overflow is constructed with stone piers and concrete overflow, which may be raised at any time it becomes necessary to store more water. The dam at its present stage is about one mile long, with an average width of 100 feet. When the dam is raised to the proposed flow-line, it will he about 9.000 feet long, with an average width of 1,000 feet and an estimated capacity of 50,000,000 gallons. With this proposed storage and the old systems still untouched. it is considered that an ample supply for all future contingencies has been provided. The tunnel, which is 3,450 feet long, connects with the dam by a channel, which is excavated at right angles from the centre of the dam to the gatehouse, located at the east end of the tunnel. This channel conveys the water to. and through the gates and screens to the tunnel, which has a fall of five feet throughout its length. The tunnel is excavated five feet wide and seven feet high, with concrete approaches at each end, the fall in the tunnel being so slight that the water in it remains at the same level as that in the dam. The pipeline, or conduit begins at the west end of the tunnel, where it is connected with the concrete Work, supplied with a twenty-inch valve, which controls the flow to the pipe-line system. The elevation at this point is 210 feet above the town, which gives a maximum pressure of eighty-five pounds and an average pressure of sixtv-seven pounds to the square inch in the town. The gatehouse located at the east end of the tunnel is twenty-one feet by twenty-one feet and fifteen feet high. It is constructed of stone masonry and supplied with three twenty-four-inch valves and a number of screens. Although the tunnel is not cemented or otherwise finished, yet there is no perceptible leakage, the rock strata being very firm and free front crevices. The area of the watershed supplying Anderson creek dam, which is about six square miles, is for the most part barren lands. The Anderson creek system was completed on October to. 1903. and the water was turned in on October 15, 1903. The pipe-line was tested and found very satisfactory. The cost of the new system, when completed, was $178,148.74. The cost of the distribution system since that date was $27,290.46. and the purchase price of the old system, $61.500—making the total cost of the entire system to March 1, 1905, $266,939.20. The distribution system inside the city limits consists of the following: Forty-five thousand four hundred feet of six-inch cast iron pipe; 6,400 feet of eightinch cast iron pipe; 3.200 feet of ten-inch cast iron pipe; 5,600 feet of twelve-inch cast iron pipe; 2.000 feet of four-inch cast iron pipe—making in all 63.000 feet, or eleven miles. 4,920 feet of piping of all sizes. There are 122 fire hydrants owned by the city, and twelve by private institutions— making a total of 134 available for fire protection and other uses. The Corey hydrant and Rensselaer valves have been adopted, and there are now installed 100 gate-valves of all sizes. The cash receipts for the year ending March 1, 1905, were $17,047.09, and the free water used for municipal purposes and earned by the water department amounted to $3,868.41—making a total of the earnings of the department $21,762.20. The expenditures for operating the plant for the same period were $5,32545—leaving a balance of earnings of $16,434.75. Up to December, 1904, there were 828 taps and 1,019 consumers—688 being on contract rates and 339 on meter. W. T. White, who is the present water commissioner, has served in that capacity since March 1, 1901. His portrait is printed herewith, also an illustration of the dam made from a photograph taken for FIRE AND WATER ENC.INF.ERINO,

W. T. WHITE, WATER COMMISSIONER.SPILLWAY AT ANDERSON CREEK DAM, DU BOIS, PA.

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